LEGO Minifigure Year by Year: A Visual History by Gregory Farshtey with Daniel Lipkowitz

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LEGO Minifigure Year by Year: A Visual History is a book about LEGO minifigs from the years 1978 to 2013.  What I like about it is the cool LEGO guys.  There are lots of unique LEGO guys.  I think it would be best for kids.

Later,

Slime

OTHER COMMENTARY:

Lori — This is just the kind of book that my son loves–lots of photos and encyclopedia-type entries.  The photos are crisp, colorful and engaging.  The contents are formatted very nicely, and a lot of information is shared in the concise text.  I would give this a big thumbs-up for all LEGO fans, whether a child or adult.  It’s just really fun to see the variety of minifigures throughout the years.

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The Worst Class Trip Ever by Dave Barry

Worst Class Trip EverThis post contains an affiliate link.

The Worst Class Trip Ever is about Wyatt, Suzana, and Matt.  They go on a field trip to Washington, D.C.  While they are on the plane, Matt and Wyatt see two men looking at aerial photos of the White House.  They think that the two men are going to try to kill the president when they fly over the White House.  Matt takes something out of the two men’s backpack.  They find out that the thing that they took out of the men’s backpack is a laser radio jammer.  Read the book to find out what the two men were going to do with the jammer. I recommend it for preteens and up.  I would rate it PG for violence, action and peril.

Bubba says good-bye.

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The Son of Neptune by Rick Riordan

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The Son of Neptune is a book about Percy Jackson.  Percy is wandering around the USA.  He is being followed by the three Gorgon sisters who are trying to kill him, but every time they hurt him Percy does not feel it.  Percy has lost his memory, the only things that he can remember are his own name and Annabeth’s.  He makes it to a camp for Half-bloods, and he himself is a Half-blood.  He along with Hazel and Frank, the guards at the gate  and his friends, must go on a journey to rescue Death and get back the twelfth legion’s golden eagle standard.  I rate it PG for violence, peril and adventure.  I recommend it for preteens and up.  It’s the second book in the Heroes of Olympus series.

Bubba says good-bye!

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

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The Lost Hero is a book about the Roman gods.  It’s a story about a boy named Jason who is a demigod.  (You will find out what a demigod is, when and if you read the Percy Jackson and the Olympians books.  I recommend that you read them first.)  Jason and three other demigods are supposed  to go on a quest.  It must be completed by the winter solstice,  four days after they get to the camp.  (I am using movie ratings again.)  I would rate this book PG for action, peril and violence.  I recommend it for preteens and up.  It’s the first book in the Heroes of Olympus series.

Bubba says good-bye!  Oh, Mow wants to say good-bye too (he’s in my avatar photo).  Meow!

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The Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan

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The Red Pyramid is the first book in the Kane Chronicles series.  It is much less confusing if you read this book first, but it is still pretty confusing.

This is a good book about the Egyptian gods.  It’s a story about a boy and girl whose father awakes five of the Egyptian gods.  Set, one of the five Egyptian gods, tries to build a pyramid to take power from it and become the king of the gods!  I would rate this (I am using movie ratings because it is easier) PG for some violence, action and peril.  I recommend it for preteens and up.

Bubba is signing out!

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The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett

The Color of Magic 1This post contains an affiliate link.

Let me just start out by saying that my husband and I are both Terry Pratchett fans.  I know that his books are not everyone’s cup of tea.  It really takes a certain type of person to appreciate his books.  You have to appreciate English humor, especially its subtlety.  You should be a fan of fantasy literature, and it helps if you’re a bit of a geek.  If you fit those requirements, I highly recommend his writing to you.

The Color of Magic is the first in the Discworld series of books about a fantasy land and a wide cast of unique inhabitants.  This land isn’t really restricted by things like gravity, probability, absolutes of time and space, etc.  It’s a fantasy world that does not take itself seriously and which can change in the blink of an eye.

Since this is the first book in the series, you should expect it to be less polished than later books.  While I did enjoy it immensely, I can see how the story doesn’t flow quite as smoothly as others that I’ve read.  The plot seems somewhat disjointed and the sheer number of characters and places introduced can be bewildering, as well.

If you’re a Pratchett fan, read the book anyway.  If you want to be a Pratchett fan–read it.  If you want to follow the advice of a total stranger–read it.

Let me know what you thought of the book!

Possible Objections:

  1. Lots of violence–it’s how many issues are solved.
  2. There are plenty of allusions to things of a sexual nature.
  3. One kingdom is full of barely clothed people.

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER THE COLOR OF MAGIC POSTS:

Sideways Stories from Wayside School & Wayside School Is Falling Down by Louis Sachar

Wayside School 1This post contains an affiliate link.

Hermit the Crab (Daddy) likes to read to the kids at night.  They snuggle up on the couch and he can usually get a couple of chapters in before bedtime.  Their two most recent books were Sideways Stories from Wayside School and Wayside School Is Falling Down.

Both books are essentially collections of short stories about the kids in Mrs. Jewls’ classroom at Wayside School.  This is a school full of insane shenanigans.  Don’t look for stories that make a lick of sense in these books–they are pure tomfoolery and fun.  My husband and I both read these when we were young, and we wanted to share them with our kids.  They absolutely loved them, too.

WHAT WE THOUGHT:

Hermit the Crab–The stories are consistently funny and several of them have thought-provoking morals.  The characters really make the book–each one is well-developed in their own right.  The stories are silly and unrealistic, but good nonetheless.

Lori–I love how the stories make me laugh out loud!  I’m all about humor therapy.

Bubba–These books were funny, weird and even weirder.  I like D.J. because he smiles pretty much every single second of his life.

Slime–These books are awesome.  They’re funny.  Actually, hilarious.  I like both of them a lot.  I really like Terrence and the silly-sounding insults he says to everyone else.

Possible objections:

  1. Some of the children model bad behavior, such as rudeness, stealing, lying, etc.
  2. Kathy, one of the children, is rather a despicable character.
  3. In one of the stories Mrs. Jewls repeatedly tells the children to “shut up.”
  4. Some of the stories are a bit unsettling and take a slightly dark turn.

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Greetings!

I’d like to extend a big ‘hello’ from the Book Buffoons!  We’re an off-the-wall family who enjoys reading to an almost freakish degree.  This blog is a venture that will involve the entire family.  We have some ideas to get us started on this journey, but I’m also curious to see how this will evolve over time.  Won’t you join us on this wild and mostly interesting ride through the land of many books?

Until next time…

The Berserker