Empyrion: The Search for Fierra by Stephen R. Lawhead

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Empyrion: The Search for Fierra is a book which my husband recommended.  It’s an older book, but one he enjoyed as a young man.  Now it’s my turn to enjoy it!

Premise:

Orion Treet is hired to take part in a mission to check on the status of a space colony which has been established by a private company.  Three others are a part of the team and they successfully locate the colony on a far distant planet, but something has gone horribly wrong.  Not only have they arrived in the wrong time period, but they’ve also stumbled into a dystopia.  Their reception is less than ideal, and they must find a way to escape and find the Fieri, the other group of human descendants.  Can they find the answers to what went wrong and make things right again?

My thoughts:

I liked this book a lot more than I expected to.  It’s a unique story about how a human society develops, removed from the influences of Earth.  The setting is interesting and the supporting characters are unique, if a bit odd at times.  Yarden, Treet’s love interest, is definitely an enigma.  The end of the book segues into the next, when Treet continues his mission to keep Fierra safe.  I left out a lot of details, but I didn’t want to totally ruin the story for you.  It’s more fun to discover Empyrion for yourself.  🙂

I’m looking forward to reading the next book in the series, but it will probably have to wait a little while.  We’re scheduled to move in a few days and I don’t want to tote library books along with us!

I recommend this book to teen and adult fans of science fiction.  It’s a unique and entertaining adventure story, which I think you’ll really enjoy.

Favorite quotes:

“Treet had to admit that he did indeed like living; it was, after all, one of the things that made life so worthwhile.” (p.2)

“To be alive and know you were dying and know too there was nothing you could do about it, thought Treet in one of his lucid moments, was surely the worst trick of a whole universe full of lousy tricks.” (p.343)

Possible Objections:

  • A little violence
  • A bit of bad language
  • Religious commentary (There is a distinct good vs. evil undertone to the book, which can easily be ascribed a Christian influence.)

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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The Shores of Tripoli: Lieutenant Putnam and the Barbary Pirates by James L. Haley

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I received an ARC of The Shores of Tripoli and just finished it the other day.  I was intrigued by this book because I didn’t know anything about the Barbary Wars, which took place in the early 1800’s.

Premise:

Readers are taken on a tour of life in the navy during the period of history when the U. S. engaged in the Barbary Wars.  We follow a fictitious main character through a setting, details and events which are accurate and historical.  Bliven Putnam begins his naval career as a midshipman and is promoted to Lieutenant Commodore by the end of the book.  He experiences many fantastic adventures in his time in the navy, which shape him into a man.  There is also commentary on the politics and political climate of the time throughout the story.  Many interesting supporting characters enter into The Shores of Tripoli, such as the rulers of the Barbary States, Commodore Preble, Mr. & Mrs. Barton, Tobias Lear, and Sam Bandy.  They all add considerably the narrative.

My thoughts:

By setting a fictitious character in the midst of history, the author managed to tell a story which was both captivating and informative.  I really enjoyed this story and feel like my understanding of early U. S. history has improved.  The narrative is quite descriptive and compelling, which should keep you reading at a good clip.  The end of the book leaves you hanging, but they might be setting it up for another installment.

The only issue I had was that I am unfamiliar with the parts of a ship.  The descriptions of what they were doing with sails, jibs, etc. went over my head.

I would recommend this book to those who enjoy learning about history in an entertaining way.  By following Putnam’s journey through real-life events, you will get an insider’s look at the Barbary Wars of the early 1800’s.  It’s certainly an engaging way to learn history!

Possible Objections:

  • Some violence
  • Some sexual themes
  • A bit of foul language/crass words

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

*I received a free ARC of this book and have shared my honest opinion.

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4 Favorite Children’s Books #1

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I’m starting a new series of posts which feature our favorite children’s picture books.  They usually aren’t long or complex enough to warrant an entire blog post, but if I give you a batch of four, it makes it a bit more worthwhile.  As you can see, our books are well-loved.  😉

Baby Food by Saxton Freymann & Joost Elffers

I remember back when this book first came out, and I was so impressed by it.  I loved the adorable animals made from fruits and vegetables!  The text is very simple, but the authors’ creativity in assembling recognizable animals from food is really impressive.  My kids love this book and enjoy reciting the different foods that the animals are made from.

One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss

Who hasn’t heard of this book?  It’s a classic that I grew up with, and now my kids are enjoying it, too.  The sing-song rhyme is very catchy and the illustrations are wonderfully whimsical.  This book explores many animals from the imaginary world of Dr. Seuss.

The Day the Goose Got Loose by Reeve Lindbergh

I love the illustrations of Steven Kellogg–they practically make this book!  This is a story about a goose who gets loose and causes mayhem on the farm.  The antics are hilarious and we laugh every time we read it.

Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney

This is one of those feel-good bedtime stories.  Little Nutbrown Hare and Big Nutbrown Hare compete to see who loves the other more.  No matter how hard he tries, Little Hare is outdone by Big Hare in his exclamations of love.  It’s a cute and heartwarming story.

Fairy World: Enter the Magical and Mysterious Realm by Stella A. Caldwell

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Fairy World came to us from the library of the next town over.  Yes, I’m getting to the end of the stack.  They just have a better selection of books than we have here in town.

Premise:

Fairy World is a guide to all things fairy.  It is presented as the author’s research on fairies, which she is supposed to have seen at various times.  It includes sections on A World of Fairies (location & appearance), Fairy Kingdoms, Enchantment, and Blessings and Curses.  There are also case studies scattered throughout the book, which tell about related creatures (Dryad, Boggart, Selkie, etc.).

My thoughts:

What can I say about this book?  It is completely charming and celebrates the whimsical and enchanting world of fairies (and their kin).  I think the book does an admirable job of briefly covering the many different areas that have to do with fairy lore.  Though I’m a bit old to really appreciate and enjoy this book now, I would have loved it as a child.  I enjoyed anything make-believe and magical.  My girls, of course, love fairies.

I like the illustrations in this book–they’re a fun mixture of enhanced photos, charming drawings, and cobbled-together fantasy lands.  Any child who likes fairies will enjoy all of the visuals.

I would recommend this book for elementary through preteen children.  They are probably the audience most likely to enjoy immersing themselves in the fairy world (though there are sure to be some adult fairy fans out there, too).

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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Super Shark Encyclopedia and Other Creatures of the Deep by Derek Harvey

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Super Shark Encyclopedia is another book that came from our out-of-town library trip.  My second son absolutely loves encyclopedia-type books, so I thought he might enjoy looking at this one.

Premise:

This is an encyclopedic book which teaches the reader about many different ocean creatures.  There is a short section at the beginning of the book which shows the different “layers” of the ocean and briefly explains them.  It has sections on Amazing Anatomy, Animal Athletes, Life Stories, Supernatural Senses, and Exploring the Deep.  Creatures are featured using full-color photography, basic statistics, and a short description.  A short glossary in the back helps out with more uncommon terms.

My thoughts:

We really like this book.  It has interesting tidbits of information about many different sea creatures, and that information is perfectly complimented by the wonderful visuals.  It’s short enough that I can look at it with my smaller kids, but contains enough information to keep my elementary-age kids reading it themselves, too.  Personally, I love any book about animals.  This one is quite engaging.

The photos in this book are amazing!  They are clear and colorful, close-up and just plain beautiful.  The pages are quite large so that means the photos are nice and large, too.

I would recommend this book for elementary through preteen children.  The entries are fairly concise and may not contain enough information to satisfy older readers.

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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12 Years a Slave – Movie 2013

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I finally got around to watching 12 Years a Slave, the movie adaptation of the book by the same name.  The first two copies which I requested from the library were scratched, so I couldn’t watch the entire movie.  Copy number three was the charm.

Just to review, this is the story of Solomon Northup, a free man from New York who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in the South.  If you want to know more about the specifics of the story, check out my book review.  The movie follows the book quite closely.  There were a few changes, most of them minor and not detracting from the main story at all.  Of course some things needed to be condensed to keep the length of the movie reasonable.  A benefit to watching the movie over the book is that you lose the old-fashioned language in which the book is written.  The movie emphasizes the events, so you don’t get bogged down with the dated and sometimes awkward language.

My thoughts:

I think that this movie was done wonderfully well.  It’s such a heartbreaking story and that is exactly what it does to you when you watch it–it breaks your heart.  The actors were phenomenal–even the ones you hate do a great job in their role.  Chiwetel Ejiofor, the actor who played Solomon was amazing.  I fully felt that he was Solomon and thought that he conveyed the complex feelings of the character realistically.

There are a few things I should warn you about if you are thinking of seeing this movie.  The dehumanizing and violent treatment of the slaves is very disturbing.  There are a few scenes of graphic violence which show blood spraying and the skin split open from whippings.  There are also a couple of hanging scenes.  I had to unfocus my eyes a few times because I couldn’t bear to just sit there and look at that for more than a couple of seconds.

12 Years a Slave is emotionally raw and it will leave you feeling that way by the end of the movie.  Of course I cried.  You’d have to be a stone not to.  Although it’s painful to watch this type of movie, I think it’s our duty to try and more fully understand the history of our country–even the ugly parts.  We have to learn from our past mistakes.

I highly recommend this movie to adults.

Possible Objections:

  • Nudity
  • A couple of sexual scenes
  • Foul language, including racial epithets
  • Violence, some of it quite graphic

Rated: R

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

 

OTHER 12 YEARS A SLAVE POSTS:

Maker Lab: 28 Super Cool Projects by Jack Challoner

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I found Maker Lab when we went to the library in a nearby town.  I was hoping that we would be able to do a few of the projects in our homeschooling, but that will have to wait.  We’re packing up to move and most of our supplies are languishing in storage right now.

Premise:

This book is aimed at kids who want to do their own maker projects.  The 28 projects fall into four categories: Food For Thought, Around the Home, Water World, and The Great Outdoors.  Each project has a supply list, clear instructions, a sample, and a short explanation about how it works.  The pictures are colorful and engaging, and enhanced by whimsical doodles.  There is also a short glossary at the end of the book to explain some of the more scientific terms.

My thoughts:

If I were a child, I would want this book!  That’s because I’m a perpetual crafter/project-tackler.  Any child who enjoys doing those hands-on projects will get excited when they see the awesome projects they can complete themselves.

The illustrations and projects are great, but there are only 28 total projects.  So while this is a fun book, it will not keep the dedicated project-maker occupied for too long.  Once you’ve tackled all of the projects, it would be a nice gesture to pass it on to a friend.

I would recommend this book for children of all ages.  The younger ones will need help with the projects, and the older ones will gain satisfaction from completing the projects on their own.

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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National Geographic Guide to the World’s Supernatural Places: More Than 250 Spine-Chilling Destinations Around the Globe by Sarah Bartlett

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My son brought home Supernatural Places from the library.  I put it up on the shelf because I didn’t want my younger kids finding it; some of the illustrations are rather spooky.  It looked quite compelling, so I perused it one evening once the kids had gone to bed.

Premise:

This is a non-fiction reference book, which gives you a short blurb on many different supernatural locations around the world.  It covers everything from haunted houses to ancient ruins, people groups to natural spaces.  One page is devoted to each location, and includes a photo and basic information.  The sections include: Haunted Places, Vampire Haunts, Witchcraft and the Dark Arts, Sacred Places, UFO Hot Spots, and Myths & Legends.

My thoughts:

I found this book utterly fascinating, and definitely spooky!  I’m not into horror, so this is about as macabre as I like to go.  Some of the entries are icky–such as the cannibalistic clan in Scotland during the 17th century.  Most of the entries are not gory, but be warned that there are a few.  The photos are wonderful–I love reference books with good photography!

This book is a great teaser for many interesting places and events throughout history.  It’s good as a jumping off point, if you want to do more research and a fuller study of some of these fascinating places.  It would also make a great coffee table book.

I would recommend this book for older teens to adults because of the mature subject matter.

Possible objections:

  • occult themes
  • sexual themes
  • gory elements
  • general scariness

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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The Unofficial Holy Bible for Minecrafters: A Children’s Guide to the Old & New Testament by Garrett Romines & Christopher Miko

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I spotted The Unofficial Holy Bible for Minecrafters at the library and had to bring it home to check it out.  My boys are very into Minecraft, as I’m sure many other kids are.  What better than to illustrate Bible stories using Minecraft illustrations?!

Premise:

This book contains an assortment of Bible stories which are illustrated Minecraft-style.  The illustrations are actual builds which somebody did in the Minecraft game.  The choice of stories is random and this is by no means a complete Bible.  Also the text of the stories is vastly shortened, resembling the style of comic books.

My thoughts:

Personally, I wouldn’t choose to sit down and read this book because Minecraft doesn’t appeal to me.  However, my boys love Minecraft and I can see how this book would hook them into reading about the stories of the Bible while enjoying the visuals of the Minecraft world.

Kids will not gain great understanding of the Bible by reading this book, but it is a fun way for them to enjoy the stories in another format.  I’ve found that younger boys in particular seem to gravitate towards a comics-style Bible versus a regular one.

This book would make a great gift, or addition to a church’s library.  It would also be a good way to get a child to read who is interested in Minecraft, but not much of a reader.

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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The Unschooling Handbook: How to Use the Whole World As Your Child’s Classroom by Mary Griffith

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I picked up The Unschooling Handbook at the library in the next town over when we made it into a day trip.  What can I say?  The most important feature to us in any community is the library.  We’re geeks.

They had a decent homeschooling section, and the topic of unschooling is mighty appealing to me.  I’d say we’re already half-way there with our relaxed way of doing school.  We keep holding onto a bit of guiding the kids’ learning though, because the idea of unschooling makes my husband panic.  Daddy is not a pretty sight when he panics about the kids’ schooling.  Usually lectures ensue.

So back to the book I’m reviewing.  The Unschooling Handbook is an excellent resource for anybody who wants to learn about unschooling, or who is already doing it themselves.  Not only is this a how-to of unschooling, but it includes a wealth of information from respondents, to questions which the author disseminated.

Here is an outline of what you can find in the book:

  • Information on how to incorporate reading, writing, math, science, history, and the arts into unschooling
  • Discussion on practical matters–legal requirements, monetary and time limits, working with multiple children, support group info., how to cope with doubts & challenges, etc.
  • Lots of discussion on learning styles, educational philosophies, the parent’s role in unschooling, etc.
  • A ton of additional resource suggestions
  • Sample schedules or activity lists
  • Many anecdotes & observations from unschooling parents & children

My thoughts:

I loved this book!  It is highly readable.  The author combines facts with anecdotes and, I believe, hits on a good balance between the two.  If you’re not a person who enjoys anecdotes and testimony, you will probably be frustrated with the book.

I highly recommend this book to anybody who engages in unschooling, is considering the method, or just wants to know more about it.  I think the book would also be beneficial for parents who want to stick with a more conventional homeschooling method.  If nothing else-–it may help them gain a bit more confidence in their child’s ability to learn and grow if allowed to blossom on their own timetable.

Favorite quotes:

“Unschooling would be helpful to all children.  It’s not one particular way of learning; it’s learning at your own level, in your own interest, and at your own pace.  What child wouldn’t benefit from a learning experience like that?”

(Laura, California, p.207)

“I feel that unschooling families often know a lot more about the nature of learning and education than just about anybody.  It’s unfortunate that professional educators are generally not able to grasp that.  We have a lot we could teach them, and I’m still always surprised when I realize that they think it’s the other way around.

As time goes by, I’m more and more stunned by the questions people ask: ‘What gave you the idea you were capable of teaching your child in the first place?’  The question seems strange enough, but they picture me sitting and ‘teaching’ him as if he’s an empty vessel who can’t learn on his own.  What an obnoxious image that brings to my mind, and yet it’s a perfectly natural thing for people to think.  ‘How do you know what he’s supposed to be learning?’  Huh?  In a world as vast and complex as this one, how did we ever come to this mutual understanding that there is just one neat package of stuff one needs to get into one’s head to be ‘educated.’  Who is the official authority on what he’s ‘supposed to be learning’? ”

(Lillian, California, p.204)

“I’ve always said that homeschooling in any form is really a lifestyle choice and not just an educational choice.  Unschooling just makes it more so.  It is a decision to put children first, to respect their needs and opinions, to treat them as fully human beings and not as property.  I find that unschooling has allowed me to live more the way that I want to live, in a slower, more deliberate, more thought-out way, and not in the rat race of constant busyness and rushing from one thing to another.”

(Carol, Florida, p.200)

“Unschooling has deeply affected our lives in general.  My attitudes toward society have changed–or, I should say, have become more clear.  When we took that first anxiety-filled step away from public school, I realized that we were leaving behind our place in society as well–casting off a whole life.  I knew that people would view us differently, maybe antagonistically; I knew that I was now standing up for my beliefs by living them where people could see and pass judgment.  It has led to being more forthright in all aspects of my life, and to having more courage in confrontations of all sorts.  It’s easier to see the charades of society, and how so much importance is connected to being part of a herd.”

(Liane, California, p.202)

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

M. C. Higgins, the Great by Virginia Hamilton

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M.C. Higgins, the Great is the second book from my Thrift Store Young Adult Reading Challenge.  It’s the 1975 Newbery Medal winner.

Premise:

M.C. Higgins lives on a mountain that his family has owned since his great-grandmother, an escaped slave, made it her haven.  Their home is in danger, though, because of a slag heap left behind by coal miners.  M.C. hopes that his family can escape the mountain when his mother’s heavenly singing voice is discovered.  But will his wishes come true?  Friendship also enters into the tale–with M.C.’s friend Ben, and a mysterious girl who shows up on the mountain one day.

My thoughts:

This book was strange.  It has a unique writing style and the characters’ language is somewhat odd.  Also, I found that I wasn’t very interested in what was going on plot-wise.  It’s very basic, but that doesn’t necessarily make a book boring.  I guess the plot just seemed rather meandering and lacking focus.

The characters were hard to get attached to, as well.  I’m not sure why, but I didn’t care much about what happened to them in the story.  There needs to be an emotional connection with the characters in a book, and that was missing in this story.

I’d say that this is a coming-of-age story, but in my opinion there are coming-of-age stories which are much more engaging, entertaining and meaningful.

I don’t recommend this book, though if you want to try it out it’s aimed at school-age kids.

Rating: 2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg

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The boys and I just finished From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler as our chapter book for homeschooling.  I read this book as a child, but had forgotten the details.  It’s the 1968 Newbery Medal winner.

Premise:

Claudia and Jamie Kincaid decide to run away from home and hit upon the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City as their home away from home.  They successfully evade detection–sleeping on one of the antique beds, bathing in the fountain, and hiding their belongings in various locations.  When a statue arrives at the museum which could be the work of Michelangelo, Claudia won’t rest until she finds out the truth about the statue’s origins.

My thoughts:

My kids and I enjoyed this book, even though it is not full of rip-roaring action.  The story is more of a meandering tale about a brother and sister who learn how to be self-sufficient and how to function as a team.  Claudia and Jamie partake in the typical teasing banter of siblings, which adds humor and levity to the story.

I think kids who read this book will enjoy the idea of children taking care of themselves and making an interesting museum their home.  Personally, I found the story amusing but don’t feel like I’ll return to it for any subsequent reads.

This is an amusing book for those who are in the later elementary/preteen years.  I’m not certain that it will hold the attention of everyone in that age group, though.

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Holding On to Hope: A Pathway through Suffering to the Heart of God by Nancy Guthrie

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Another read from some time ago is Holding On to Hope.  I don’t know where I got this book from; it had been sitting on my shelf for quite some time.  Since I’ve had bouts of feeling hopeless lately, I thought it might be time to read it.

Premise:

Nancy and her husband share recessive genes for a rare birth disorder.  They lost two children to this disease and Nancy writes from a place of great pain.  She shares her story, but intersperses Job’s story, as well.  (You know, the guy from the Bible who lost everything in one day and ended up covered in painful boils.)  She raises insights into why God allows suffering, what emotions are normal in the midst of it, how we can move forward, and how it can help us in our relationship with God.

My thoughts:

As I got a couple of chapters into the book, I honestly wanted to shut it and put it back on the shelf.  There were some hard truths in there that I really didn’t want to think about.  I was feeling justified in some of my feelings, and didn’t want to be told that perhaps I was wrong.  I didn’t want to take the higher road or be the bigger person.  I wanted to wallow in my self-pity.  What’s so wrong with that?

I decided that I should try to slog through the rest of the book, even though it was telling me some things I didn’t want to hear.  It did get better, both in broadening my mental horizons and in helping me to understand where the author was coming from.

If you have experienced loss, pain, disappointment, or anything else that has made you feel totally defeated, then I think this book is for you.  You may not like all that it has to say, but I think you’ll still gain some helpful insights.  The book is relatively short, so it shouldn’t be a big chore to make it through.

This book is written from a Christian perspective, so if that’s not your thing, you may want to skip it.

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Kingdom Works: True Stories about God and His People in Inner City America by Bart Campolo

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Kingdom Works is another social justice book which I read some time ago.  For those of you interested in that subject, this book is full of anecdotal stories from an inner-city Christian ministry director.

Premise:

This is a collection of stories from Bart Campolo, the leader of a volunteer organization called Mission Year.  Mission Year brings young people into the inner city to live together in community with other young Christians, to partner with local churches, and to minister in their communities.  All of the stories come out of that setting.  It isn’t meant to be a textbook on how to do ministry, nor does it outline deep spiritual insights that can be learned from each story.

My thoughts:

I enjoyed reading this book, though there are parts that are uncomfortable to read.  When it isn’t just a made up story, but the heartache experienced by real people, it can be difficult to look at.  Our natural inclination is to turn away.  Each of the stories, whether things turned out good, bad or somewhere in between, has insights to offer and will broaden your thinking.  That is where the value lies in this book–it makes you think and it challenges your preconceived ideas.  Most stories leave you with more questions than you started with and wondering about theological issues and how they relate to the problems shared.

A couple of favorite quotes:

In speaking of the type of ministry that Mission Year engages in, Bart said, “This is not a high-powered evangelism ministry.  There are plenty of those already.  This is a settle-down-and-love-your-neighbor ministry, where the evangelism has to come naturally if it comes at all.” (p.31)

“In that awful moment I realized for the first time that out there in the real world the choices are not always between right and wrong, but sometimes between bad and worse.” (p. 53)

I would recommend this book for adults and possibly high schoolers, depending on their maturity level.  Many of the stories talk about things like drinking, drugs, sex, and violence.

Possible Objections:

  • Some violence
  • Sexual themes
  • Drug references

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

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Evicted was recommended to me by my husband and a friend who had both heard about it on the radio.  They know that I’m interested in social justice issues and thought it would be right up my alley.  Guess what?  They were right!

Premise:

Matthew Desmond wanted to do some field research about eviction and the way that it affects the lives of poor people.  He settled on the city of Milwaukee as a good middle-of-the-ground sample city.  Matthew lived in the inner city for a good chunk of time and did field research, took notes, recorded audio, conducted interviews and surveys, shadowed people, and looked at the work of other researchers.  In this book he shares his findings and gives readers a front row look at how eviction has affected real people.

My thoughts:

This book was utterly fascinating.  I loved it!  I had no idea that eviction could affect so many areas of a person’s life–school and work attendance, job stability, increased costs (for storage, etc.), wasted time (looking for new housing and jobs), stress, depression, and the list goes on.  I feel like I’ve gained some great insight into one of the major problems in our large cities throughout the United States.

I found that I became quite attached to the people in this book, even those who were struggling with their own demons.  It was hard to see them trying so hard to overcome adverse circumstances and just get sucked down into the mire again.  There was one character, however, who really made me mad.  I thought the landlady was despicable in how she treated her tenants and I really wanted to ream her out.

The format of the book is highly readable.  Desmond does a great job of balancing real-life stories, his own observations, and facts gleaned from his research.

I highly recommend this book to adults and anyone who is interested in social justice issues.  It’s not really appropriate for the younger crowd because the quotes from real people contain quite a bit of bad language.

Possible Objections:

  • Bad language
  • A bit of violence

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori