I Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye by Brook Noel & Pamela D. Blair, Ph.D.

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Title: I Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye: Surviving, Coping & Healing After the Sudden Death of a Loved One by Brook Noel & Pamela D. Blair, Ph.D.

Premise:

This book is meant to be a reference aid for those who have experienced the sudden loss of a loved one.  It features personal stories, guidelines for coping and healing, grief recovery exercises, information about the grieving process, additional resources, and more.

My thoughts:

This is the most recent book I read in my quest to find quality books which cover the topic of grief.  The title jumped out at me because of my sister’s sudden death.  I haven’t found many books that deal with sudden death, in particular.

 

Personally, this was a very cathartic read for me.  I came away with a sense of affirmation and understanding, and the acceptance of being okay with my current progress in my grief journey.  The authors really emphasize the fact that grief is a journey, not a destination, and that there is no prescribed method or timeline for it.  For someone who is feeling out of control, like they are regressing, or like they’ll never “get better,” this is a very helpful thing to hear.  I agree with the authors that each person should make their way along the path of grief using the methods which suit them, and according to their own timetable.

 

There were some after-life views which I didn’t agree with, but the authors presented them as different modes of belief, not necessarily their own.  They neither endorsed nor discounted the different after-life beliefs, but left it open so that the book could be helpful for people of all different faiths (or no faith at all).

 

One criticism, if you can even call it that, is that I wish there were more examples of sudden deaths in which the family has to forgive the person who was responsible for their loved one’s death (i.e. murder).  It was lightly touched on, but not given a lot of discussion, probably because of the authors’ lack of experience with that kind of death.  Since it’s outside of their scope, I can’t really complain that they weren’t able to relate to those particular feelings.  I just wish I could learn about some ways to recover from a situation where your family member died a more violent death and you have to accept the fact that their killer gets a second chance at life.  Perhaps I’ll find a book like that one of these days.

 

Aside from that, there are a fair number of errors in the text which would have been caught with more careful editing.  It would have also made the book and writing style come across as more professional.

 

I recommend I Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye to those who have experienced the sudden death of a loved one and are looking for healing.  No matter where you are in the healing process, this book should have something of value to offer you.  It’s quite helpful as a reference book on grief.


A favorite quote:“Laws of nature do not make exceptions for nice people.  A bullet has no conscience; neither does a malignant tumor or an automobile gone out of control.  That is why good people get sick and hurt as much as anyone.”  (p. 70, Rabbi Kushner)

“‘Relationships with a brother or sister help children know who they are and how they fit in the family.  The bonds between siblings are woven into the fabric of each one’s life.’  When we lose a sibling, we lose a piece of ourselves, a piece of our family, and a reflection of ourselves.”  (p. 160)

Possible Objections:

  • You may not agree with all of the after-life beliefs which are presented

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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Jane Eyre: The Graphic Novel (Original Text)

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Title: Jane Eyre: The Graphic Novel (Original Text) by Charlotte Brontë

Premise:

Jane Eyre has lived a largely loveless and harsh life, first under her aunt’s roof and later at the infamous Lowood School.  When Jane becomes a young adult she ventures forth from her stifled existence, ready for the next chapter in her life.  When she arrives at Thornfield Hall as the new governess, however, she has no idea the pleasures and pain that lie in store for her.

My thoughts:

I wanted to share just a quick note on this book.  It’s a graphic novel which is totally awesome, not only for younger readers, but also for Jane Eyre aficionados.  There is a whole series of these graphic novels based on classic literature, and I will definitely be reviewing more of them in the future.  Also of note, each title comes in at least three different text formats: Original Text, Plain Text, and Quick Text.  These come in handy for different reading levels, making the story accessible to people of all ages.

On to the story!  The story line was followed quite faithfully in the graphic novel version (with only a few minor changes), and this being the Original Text version, the dialogue was also quite faithful.  It’s fun to see the artists’ imagining of how the story looks.  Seeing their imagined facial expressions and the characters’ mannerisms, along with the dialogue, is just another fun way to explore the story of Jane Eyre.  I really enjoyed it!

The illustrations are nice, though for some reason they remind me of 1970’s illustrations.  Don’t ask me why.  Also, the book is divided into chapters, so that provides some good stopping points along the way and keeps the reading manageable for those who want to digest it in stages.

I recommend Jane Eyre: The Graphic Novel to young readers who want an easier introduction to the story, as well as to Jane Eyre fans.  It’s a fun way to explore a wonderful classical story.

 

Possible Objections:

  • some violence

 

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Jane Eyre - Graphic Novel - Original Text 2.jpg

The Help by Kathryn Stockett

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Title: The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Premise:

Eugenia (Skeeter) Phelan is tired of the same old life in her hometown of Jackson, Mississippi.  She dreams of becoming a writer, but her only contact at the publishing company challenges her to write about something she cares about and submit it, before she will be considered for a job.  Skeeter decides she wants to explore what it’s like to live as a black maid in the South, and seeks maids to help her complete the project, but it’s very risky.  Will she ever get enough women to agree to be interviewed to complete the book? (This is a very abbreviated version of what the novel is about.  I didn’t want to ruin the plot line for you!)

My thoughts:

I picked this book up at Wal-mart some time ago, and just now got to reading it.  Once I started reading though, I could hardly put it down!  The story was engrossing and I enjoyed getting to know the characters, though some were not so nice.  I also appreciated that it was set in a particular historical period (the Civil Rights era) and alluded to those events and that cultural environment.

Aibileen was my favorite character because of her sweet spirit and determination to overcome life’s obstacles.  She was wise and patient, insightful and nurturing.  Minny was really fun to read about, too.  Her spunk and blunt honesty were refreshing.  I also liked Skeeter, who decided to buck tradition and think for herself.  She stuck with her convictions, even when they made her unpopular and the going got tough.

I do wish we could have seen a little more development with some of the characters.  I feel like Celia could have undergone a metamorphosis, and Skeeter would have been better served having had a grand epiphany, but I’m not the author.  Though I had hoped for just a smidge more from the characters, I enjoyed seeing their progression in their thinking, relationships with one another, and their commitment to their mutual project.

Once criticism that I’ve heard about this book is that it’s impossible for the author to truly know what it was like to be a black maid in the South during that era.  (The author is white, relatively young, and not poor.)  I knew that going into the book, so I wasn’t expecting this to be a historically accurate novel in terms of character portrayal.  I think  the author did a fair job of imagining what it would be like to be a black maid during that time, and really, that’s the most we can ask of her.  So just take her portrayals with a grain of salt and don’t get bent out of shape if it’s not 100% accurate.  This issue didn’t really bother me at all, but I know that it’s a hang-up for others.

There is one thing about the book which did bother me, though.  There’s a scene where Minny and Celia are accosted by another character, in a very objectionable and yucky way, and to me, it felt very out of character with the rest of the book.  I understand how it helped the plot progress by putting the characters in the situation they were in, but I feel like the same plot progression could have been achieved in a less disgusting way.  Notice I’m not giving too many details, but if you’ve read the book, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about.  It’s really not something I can discuss in polite company.

There’s another thing that happens in the novel which I don’t think is very realistic.  When Minny makes the pie for Miss Hilly, I don’t believe she would have done it as portrayed in the story.  It doesn’t jive with her character, plus people just don’t want to dabble with that stuff anyway.  Again, read the book and you’ll know what I’m referring to.

I recommend The Help to adults who enjoy period novels, particularly ones that take place during the Civil Rights era (with the caveat that there are two parts that you will probably dislike).  Though this is a fictitious account, the time period during which it takes place gives it an interesting cultural context, and helps us feel a little more about what it may have felt like to live in the South during that time.

A favorite quote:

“The next few weeks is real important for Mae Mobley.  You think on it, you probably don’t remember the first time you went to the bathroom in the toilet bowl stead of a diaper.  Probably don’t give no credit to who taught you, neither.  Never had a single baby I raise come up to me and say, Aibileen, why I sure do thank you for showing me how to go in the pot.”  (p. 126)

Possible Objections:

  • outdated and offensive racial language
  • some sexual stuff (one scene in particular is offensive)
  • some violence

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Almost Home by Joan Bauer

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Title: Almost Home by Joan Bauer

Premise:

Sugar Mae Cole and her mother find themselves evicted from their home when their money is gambled away by Sugar’s father, Mr. Leeland.  Mother and daughter have to negotiate their way through the new and frightening experience of being homeless.  When things take a turn for the worse, Reba falls apart and Sugar wonders if they will ever be a normal family again.

My thoughts:

My son and I read this book for homeschool, and we both thought it was an amazing story!  We had left off reading it shortly before we moved out of our old house, and then picked it up again later when we were technically homeless and staying at my parents’ house.  It was so refreshing and cathartic to read this book while we were going through that process and I honestly think it helped my son to better deal with our situation.

The book is well written and the characters are very nicely developed.  Sugar is just about the sweetest young lady you’ll ever meet in a book, and her tenacity and will to overcome are admirable.  Though she and her mom are in a very dire situation, Sugar tries to look at the positive and keep her mom’s spirits up.  I don’t want to tell you everything that happens with Reba, but suffice it to say that she doesn’t deal with the situation quite as well as Sugar does.  Sugar’s coping mechanisms are her poetry and her lovable dog, Shush, who has a knack for encouraging those who need it most.

If you are ever in contact with a child who has experienced homelessness or been in the foster care system, I would highly recommend Almost Home to them.  Do them a favor and give them a copy of this book.  It’s a charming, yet honest look at how a child is affected by homelessness and foster care, but it still gives the reader hope and reminds them that there is still the possibility for bright things in their future.  I highly recommend it to everyone else, as well!

A favorite quote:

“Before all this happened

I wasn’t brave like I am now.

I didn’t know I could take care of my mother

Or pee by the side of the road

     and not get my underpants wet.

I didn’t know that there’s family that will help you

And family that won’t.

I didn’t know,

But I know now.

Before all this happened

I had a room that didn’t change.

I had a grandpa who was alive.

I had keys on a chain.

I had cookies cooling on a counter.

I had a porch and neighbors and a butterfly named Fanny

Who would fly away and come back to visit.

I had my place in the world.

That was before.

Before is no more.”  (p. 91)

 

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Permission to Mourn by Tom Zuba

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Title: Permission to Mourn: A New Way to Do Grief by Tom Zuba

Premise:

Tom Zuba experienced the loss of three of his family members, which caused him to seek out a new way to process his grief.  This book is full of Tom’s feelings and observations about his own grief, and a healthier way for anybody to work through their grief.  It’s told in free-flow poetic form and is relatively short.

My thoughts:

I’m on the lookout for a good book on grief that I can recommend to people.  We now live in a place where the crime rate is high, and I know that we’ll be going to more funerals.  Just a fact of life.  Usually I give people a copy of A Grief Observed by C.S. Lewis, but I wanted to find at least a couple of alternatives.

Tom Zuba has experienced some horrific loss in his life, and I can’t even imagine how that grief threatened to bury him.  I appreciate his open and honest observations about his grief and how he has and continues to work through it.  Many of the feelings he shared resonated with how I felt and still feel about my sister’s death.  It made me cry, but it’s good to cry every now and again to release some of those feelings.

I don’t really agree with Tom’s ideas about what happen to a person after they die, but I’m okay reading the book just to feel like I’ve met and talked to a fellow comrade in the grief journey.  Some people would probably be upset with his ideas though, so I thought I should lay them out.  He believes that we all go to heaven and that you can communicate with your deceased loved one through signs (i.e. a butterfly landing on your hand is your loved one communicating with you from beyond the grave, etc.), and that you should actively seek out and ask for such signs.  For me the question was: Can I read a book by someone who has some profound observations on grief, but whose life views may not match up with my own?  I thought it was worth the read.

I recommend Permission to Mourn to those who are grieving the loss of a loved one, whatever stage of the journey you find yourself in right now.  Even if you don’t fully identify with Tom’s beliefs, his emotions are the same as they would be for anyone else.

A favorite quote:

“Grief is not the enemy.

Grief is the teacher.

The powerful

blessed

gift-from-God teacher.

But you must be brave enough to enter the pit.

By feeling your feelings.”  (p. 54-55)

Possible Objections:

  • different worldview than your own about what happens after death

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

The Littles Go Exploring by John Peterson

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Title: The Little Go Exploring by John Peterson

Premise:

When Tom and Lucy find Grandpa’s secret room, they finally have a clue about why he disappeared two years ago.  The Littles decide to go on a voyage to see, once and for all, what happened to him.  What will happen when they enter the Dark Woods?

My thoughts:

I’ve loved the Littles books ever since I was a kid, and this is one that I read back in those bygone days. Really, the plot is so very simple that I can’t go into it too much without giving away the entirety of the book.  Suffice it to say that it’s wholesome and charming, with some fun adventure thrown in.  If you read a Littles book be prepared for: a simple plot and story made up into short chapters for young readers.  It’s also accentuated with charming drawings, which add just as much to the story as the text does.

After I finished reading this, my son asked if we could read it together.  We just finished our last chapter book and I guess he wanted to see what this one is all about.  I’m so glad that I get to share the Littles books with him.

I recommend The Littles Go Exploring to kids who are just starting to read chapter books.  It would also be a really good family read-aloud.

 

 

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Books We Own: The Littles Series

Continuing our Books We Own posts, here is the list of our books from The Littles series by John Peterson.  I absolutely loved these books when I was a kid and I’m gratified that my kids are enjoying them now, too!

♥ = we own the book

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The Littles Series:

  1. The Littles
  2. The Littles and the Big Blizzard
  3. The Littles and the Big Storm
  4. The Littles and the Great Halloween Scare
  5. The Littles and the Lost Children
  6. The Littles and the Missing Cat
  7. The Littles and the Perfect Christmas
  8. The Littles and the Scary Halloween
  9. The Littles and the Secret Letter
  10. The Littles and the Summer Storm
  11. The Littles and the Surprise Thanksgiving Guests
  12. The Littles and the Terrible Tiny Kid
  13. The Littles and the Trash Tinies
  14. The Littles and Their Amazing New Friend
  15. The Littles and Their Friends
  16. The Littles Do Their Homework
  17. The Littles Get Lost
  18. The Littles Get Trapped!
  19. The Littles Give a Party
  20. The Littles Go Around the World
  21. The Littles Go Exploring
  22. The Littles Go on a Hike
  23. The Littles Go to School
  24. The Littles Have a Happy Valentine’s Day
  25. The Littles Have a Merry Christmas
  26. The Littles Have a Wedding
  27. The Littles Make a Friend
  28. The Littles’ Scrapbook
  29. The Littles’ Surprise Party
  30. The Littles Take a Trip
  31. The Littles to the Rescue

The Story of My Life by Helen Keller

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Title: The Story of My Life by Helen Keller

Premise:

This is Helen Keller’s autobiographical work covering the first 22 years of her life.  Before her teacher, Anne Sullivan, came to unlock the door to the outside world for Helen, hers was a very isolated and joyless existence.  Learning the manual alphabet opened up the wonders of the world to Helen and she went on to get a college education.  The last part of the book shows a progression of Helen’s thoughts, expressions and skill, as expressed in her letters.

My thoughts:

I finished reading this book a couple of days ago, and for some reason I’ve been struggling to record my thoughts about it.  I first read it as a kid, and I remember enjoying it back then.  Now that I’ve read it as an adult, I’ve developed a new appreciation for the book and probably come away with a bit more understanding.

Helen’s story is so encouraging and touching.  Her early years must have been steeped in frustration and confusion, but her life slowly blossomed as she learned to communicate and learn through the help of her teacher.  She must have had a remarkable mind to forge ahead through so many obstacles and to pursue her dream of going to college.

One thing which really stood out to me was that Helen got to rub shoulders with some pretty famous people.  She enjoyed the company of several famous authors, as well as regular interactions with Dr. Alexander Graham Bell.  It’s neat to hear about their interactions from her perspective.  Helen seems to have had a natural gift for winning people’s hearts with her fresh, novel way of looking at the world and expressing herself.  I’ll confess that I’m just a wee bit jealous that she got to meet Mark Twain.

Helen helped many people both during her lifetime and in succeeding generations.  Her academic achievements helped pave the way for those in the deaf and blind community who would come after.  Not only that, but through her writing, we get a glimpse into the mind of someone who has encountered great adversity and come out victorious on the other side.  That’s an encouragement to anyone who is feeling inadequate, discouraged, or overwhelmed.

I recommend The Story of My Life to teens through adults who would like to know more about this remarkable woman’s life.  It’s an enlightening read which will help you to better understand those who are deaf and blind, and the obstacles they face in everyday life.  Plus, it’s just a really interesting biography.

A favorite quote:

“Gradually I began to find that there were disadvantages to going to college.  The one I felt and still feel most is lack of time.  I used to have time to think, to reflect, my mind and I.  We would sit together of an evening and listen to the inner melodies of the spirit, which one hears only in leisure moments when the words of some loved poet touch a deep, sweet chord in the soul that until then had been silent.  But in college there is no time to commune with one’s thoughts.  One goes to college to learn, it seems, not to think.  When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures–solitude, books and imagination–outside with the whistling pines.”  (p. 72-73)

Possible Objections:

  • some outdated references to African Americans & glossed over issue of racial inequities (“crowds of laughing negroes,” etc.)

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Reading Goal for 2017

Being the crazy lady that I am, I made a goal for myself to read 100 books in 2017.  Yes, I know that’s ambitious.  Currently I’m only 31 books behind schedule!  😉 I’m sharing my reading goal here on my blog in the hopes that it will help me stick to my schedule and keep on track.  I’m off to read now…

My Goodreads 2017 Reading Challenge

What is your reading goal for 2017?

A Walk in the Woods – Movie 2015

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Just the other day I had the privilege of watching A Walk in the Woods, the movie adaptation of the book by the same name.  I managed to rack up $5 in library fines in the process, but by gum, I did it!  Another aside — I had to find a time to watch it when little ears wouldn’t be around to hear all of the f-bombs that I knew I’d be hearing.

For those of you who have never read the book, this is a story about an older man’s quest to hike the Appalachian Trail.  He and a friend use the opportunity to have one last hurrah, as it were.  If you want to know more about what I thought of the book, check out my book review.

My thoughts:

First, you should know that I absolutely loved the book!  That means that I was starting from a place of already being in love with the story and the author.  When following a beloved story with a movie, it can be difficult to live up to the high expectations that the reader/viewer already has.

As you know, something is lost when you translate a book into film, and this was no exception.  The movie left out the charm and wit of Bryson’s storytelling, as well as his asides on topics such as the National Forest Service, etc.  If you’ve read the book, this is a nice way to visualize the story and see the embodiment of the characters.  If you watch the movie without reading the book, just know that you are getting the short end of the stick.  The book is so much more complex, nuanced, clever and lovely.  Another thing that just doesn’t come through in the movie is the stink, sweat, toil, fatigue and monotony that was a part of the trail life.  For all of those juicy details you’ll have to pick up the book.

I didn’t care for the way Bill’s wife was portrayed in the movie as being unsupportive.  In reality she was actually very supportive and helped Bill with many aspects of the journey.  However, I think they may have changed her character to give the story some conflict.  On the other side of the coin, we have Katz whose character was magical.  Nick Nolte was a wonderfully grizzled, unsophisticated and crass Katz.  I loved his way of talking and that he threw in the expletives in an unobtrusive manner.  Katz’s dry, sardonic sense of humor comes through really well, too.

There are a few objectionable aspects to the film which you should know about.  In one scene we briefly see Nick Nolte’s derrière from afar.  There’s also regular talk about things of a sexual nature, including a short scene with implied fellatio.  Other than that, the foul language is the most pervasive objectionable aspect.

I recommend this movie to adults who enjoy a low-key, humorous movie about aging.  While the story isn’t anything to write home about, the delivery is amusing.  I feel like a group of older friends would get a kick out of watching this together.

Possible Objections:

  • Brief partial nudity
  • Sexual references
  • Lots of foul language (mostly from Katz)

Rated: R

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER A WALK IN THE WOODS POSTS:

Books We Own: The Boxcar Children Series

Since we are such awful bibliophiles, I’m finding it necessary to start a list of the books we own.  Right now my kids are really enjoying books from The Boxcar Children series by Gertrude Chandler Warner and they want me to expand our collection.  First I need to take stock of what we already own, hence the following list.  So…while this list is meant to help us keep track of our own book collection, it could be helpful to you in expanding yours also.

♥ = we own the book

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Mystery Series:

  1. The Boxcar Children
  2. Surprise Island
  3. The Yellow House Mystery
  4. Mystery Ranch
  5. Mike’s Mystery
  6. Blue Bay Mystery
  7. The Woodshed Mystery
  8. The Lighthouse Mystery
  9. Mountain Top Mystery
  10. Schoolhouse Mystery
  11. Caboose Mystery
  12. Houseboat Mystery
  13. Snowbound Mystery
  14. Tree House Mystery
  15. Bicycle Mystery
  16. Mystery in the Sand
  17. Mystery Behind the Wall
  18. Bus Station Mystery
  19. Benny Uncovers a Mystery
  20. The Haunted Cabin Mystery
  21. The Deserted Library Mystery
  22. The Animal Shelter Mystery
  23. The Old Motel Mystery
  24. The Mystery of the Hidden Painting
  25. The Amusement Park Mystery
  26. The Mystery of the Mixed-up Zoo
  27. The Camp-Out Mystery
  28. The Mystery Girl
  29. The Mystery Cruise
  30. The Disappearing Friend Mystery
  31. The Mystery of the Singing Ghost
  32. The Mystery in the Snow
  33. The Pizza Mystery
  34. The Mystery Horse
  35. The Mystery at the Dog Show
  36. The Castle Mystery
  37. The Mystery of the Lost Village
  38. The Mystery of the Purple Pool
  39. The Ghost Ship Mystery
  40. The Canoe Trip Mystery
  41. The Mystery of the Hidden Beach
  42. The Mystery of the Missing Cat
  43. The Mystery on Stage
  44. The Dinosaur Mystery
  45. The Mystery of the Stolen Music
  46. The Chocolate Sundae Mystery
  47. The Mystery of the Hot Air Balloon
  48. The Mystery Bookstore
  49. The Mystery of the Stolen Boxcar
  50. The Mystery in the Cave
  51. The Mystery on the Train
  52. The Mystery of the Lost Mine
  53. The Guide Dog Mystery
  54. The Hurricane Mystery
  55. The Mystery of the Secret Message
  56. The Firehouse Mystery
  57. The Mystery in San Francisco
  58. The Mystery at the Alamo
  59. The Outer Space Mystery
  60. The Soccer Mystery
  61. The Growling Bear Mystery
  62. The Mystery of the Lake Monster
  63. The Mystery at Peacock Hall
  64. The Black Pearl Mystery
  65. The Cereal Box Mystery
  66. The Panther Mystery
  67. The Mystery of the Stolen Sword
  68. The Basketball Mystery
  69. The Movie Star Mystery
  70. The Mystery of the Pirate’s Map
  71. The Ghost Town Mystery
  72. The Mystery in the Mall
  73. The Gymnastics Mystery
  74. The Poison Frog Mystery
  75. The Mystery of the Empty Safe
  76. The Great Bicycle Race Mystery
  77. The Mystery of the Wild Ponies
  78. The Mystery in the Computer Game
  79. The Mystery at the Crooked House
  80. The Hockey Mystery
  81. The Mystery of the Midnight Dog
  82. The Summer Camp Mystery
  83. The Copycat Mystery
  84. The Haunted Clock Tower Mystery
  85. The Disappearing Staircase Mystery
  86. The Mystery on Blizzard Mountain
  87. The Mystery of the Spider’s Clue
  88. The Mystery of the Mummy’s Curse
  89. The Mystery of the Star Ruby
  90. The Stuffed Bear Mystery
  91. The Mystery at Skeleton Point
  92. The Tattletale Mystery
  93. The Comic Book Mystery
  94. The Ice Cream Mystery
  95. The Midnight Mystery
  96. The Mystery in the Fortune Cookie
  97. The Radio Mystery
  98. The Mystery of the Runaway Ghost
  99. The Finders Keepers Mystery
  100. The Mystery of the Haunted Boxcar
  101. The Clue in the Corn Maze
  102. The Ghost of the Chattering Bones
  103. The Sword of the Silver Knight
  104. The Game Store Mystery
  105. The Mystery of the Orphan Train
  106. The Vanishing Passenger
  107. The Giant Yo-Yo Mystery
  108. The Creature in Ogopogo Lake
  109. The Rock ‘n’ Roll Mystery
  110. The Secret of the Mask
  111. The Seattle Puzzle
  112. The Ghost in the First Row
  113. The Box That Watch Found
  114. A Horse Named Dragon
  115. The Great Detective Race
  116. The Ghost at the Drive-In Movie
  117. The Mystery of the Traveling Tomatoes
  118. The Spy Game
  119. The Dog-Gone Mystery
  120. The Vampire Mystery
  121. Superstar Watch
  122. The Spy in the Bleachers
  123. The Amazing Mystery Show
  124. The Pumpkin Head Mystery
  125. The Cupcake Caper
  126. The Clue in the Recycling Bin
  127. Monkey Trouble
  128. The Zombie Project
  129. The Great Turkey Heist
  130. The Garden Thief
  131. The Boardwalk Mystery
  132. Mystery of the Fallen Treasure
  133. The Return of the Graveyard Ghost
  134. The Mystery of the Stolen Snowboard
  135. The Mystery of the Wild West Bandit
  136. The Mystery of the Soccer Snitch
  137. The Mystery of the Grinning Gargoyle
  138. The Mystery of the Missing Pop Idol
  139. The Mystery of the Stolen Dinosaur Bones
  140. The Mystery at the Calgary Stampede
  141. The Sleepy Hollow Mystery
  142. The Legend of the Irish Castle
  143. The Celebrity Cat Caper
  144. Hidden in the Haunted School
  145. The Election Day Dilemma

Specials:

  1. The Mystery on the Ice
  2. The Mystery in Washington D.C.
  3. The Mystery at Snowflake Inn
  4. The Mystery at the Ballpark
  5. The Pilgrim Village Mystery
  6. The Mystery at the Fair
  7. The Pet Shop Mystery
  8. The Niagara Falls Mystery
  9. The Mystery in the Old Attic
  10. The Windy City Mystery
  11. The Mystery of the Queen’s Jewels
  12. The Mystery of the Black Raven
  13. The Mystery in New York
  14. The Home Run Mystery
  15. The Honeybee Mystery
  16. The Mystery of the Screech Owl
  17. The Mystery of the Tiger’s Eye
  18. The Candy Factory Mystery
  19. The Mystery of Alligator Swamp
  20. The Great Shark Mystery
  21. The Black Widow Spider Mystery

Methland Book Giveaway — CLOSED

My Bookshelf Giveaway: Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town by Nick Reding

Read my review here

Enter by following the link below.  It’s open internationally to participants 18 years and older and will end on July 31, 2017.  The winner will be announced on my blog and contacted through email.  Good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

California Dreamin’ Book Giveaway — CLOSED

My Bookshelf Giveaway: California Dreamin’: Cass Elliot Before the Mamas & the Papas by Pénélope Bagieu

Read my review here

Enter by following the link below.  It’s open internationally to participants 18 years and older and will end on July 31, 2017.  The winner will be announced on my blog and contacted through email.  Good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway