Breaking Dawn – Part 2 – Movie 2012

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Last night I watched Breaking Dawn – Part 2, the movie adaptation of the second part of the book by the same name.  And I’m finished with the Twilight movies!!!  Thank you Lord, I made it through!

Lucky viewers get to meet Bella–the baby vampire.  She takes to her new role like a fish to water and finally gets to meet her baby girl, Renesmee.  Unfortunately, the Volturi catch wind of this new super-human child and believe it’s their duty to destroy the danger.  The Cullens race to gather witnesses to Renesmee’s human development, hoping it will stop the Volturi from carrying out their swift “justice.”  Jacob and the pack side with the Cullens to defend Renesmee, since she has been imprinted on by Jacob.  Who will survive in the final showdown?  If you want to know more about what I thought of the book, check out my book review.

My thoughts:

I remember enjoying the Twilight movies when they came out, but now that I’m going back and watching them in quick succession, they’ve lost their sparkle for me.  First, I’m comparing them to the books, and they just don’t measure up.  Second, the movies weren’t that well done.  For a fan who isn’t afraid to point out the flaws in a franchise, there is plenty of cannon fodder in these movies.

I feel like this movie could have been really interesting.  It features a very tense situation and lots of cool and interesting vampires, but the acting and chemistry of the characters was subpar.  I don’t care how dramatic and beautiful you are, you still need to put emotions into your lines and interact with the environment and other characters around you in a believable manner.  It seems like Edward, Bella and Jacob actually lost some of their acting ability in this movie.  Don’t ask me how.  Bad script?  Lame lines?

Now let’s talk about the CGI.  It was painful to watch.  The wolves are just kind of meh, but I can deal with that.  The CGI baby was frightening.  I think they were just trying to give her more intelligent eyes, but they didn’t look at all natural.  Her hair was creepy, too.  It’s too bad that baby Renesmee’s CGI was so poorly done because it takes away from your ability to really believe in the story you’re seeing played out in front of you.

As far as the conflict with the Volturi goes, I think that was probably the most satisfying part of the movie.  There is a lot of theatricality packed into that snow-covered clearing as two formidable supernatural groups poise for battle.  My absolute favorite part of the movie is something that didn’t even happen in the book.  –SPOILER ALERT–  When they show the battle between the Cullens, etc. and the Volturi–THAT IS THE BOMB!  A-MA-ZING fight scene!  Unfortunately, it’s a haha–got you moment when you realize it didn’t really happen after all.  In reality Aro and company go home and everyone else lives happily ever after.

I’m sorry, but my brain rebels against that kind of conclusive ending.  You’re vampires, for goodness’ sake, not librarians!  There is danger involved in that kind of lifestyle.  Whatever–I guess it was an easy way to wrap up the series.  I suppose it’s just difficult to accept such a fairytale ending for a series which has been rather dark throughout the rest of its history.

To sum up, I’d say this movie is on par with the other ones.  Just okay.  The fight scene at the end is awesome, though.  Maybe you should watch it just for that.

I recommend this movie to ladies in their teens and older who enjoy a good paranormal romance.  If you are a fan of the Twilight series, I think you will enjoy this movie.

Possible Objections:

  • Violence, blood & gore
  • Suggestive sexual content & partial nudity (though you don’t actually see the private bits)

Rated: PG-13

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

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Breaking Dawn – Part 1 – Movie 2011

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Last night I watched Breaking Dawn – Part 1, the movie adaptation of the first part of the book by the same name.  I’m almost to the end of these movies!

Bella and Edward finally wed(!) and jet off to spend a relaxed honeymoon in the tropics.  While Edward follows through on his promise of intimacy, it comes with some unintended consequences.  Bella becomes pregnant, and the entire Cullen clan scrambles to keep Bella healthy, and do their best to help her survive the birth of the fast-growing fetus.  When Jacob and the pack find out that an unknown supernatural being is developing inside of Bella, they feel it is their responsibility to get rid of the abomination.  Will Bella and the baby survive?  If you want to know more about what I thought of the book, check out my book review.

My thoughts:

I really like that they opened with the wedding scene.  It looked absolutely beautiful and felt like the culmination of Edward and Bella’s relationship.  Unfortunately, I was rather put off by the emotions displayed by the couple during their wedding.  Pattinson did okay, with his subdued emotions possibly indicating nervousness.  Bella, on the other hand, looked like she was attending a funeral.  Nary a smile crossed her lips as she spotted her true love and walked down the aisle.  Dang girl–if it’s that painful, why get married at all?  It seemed very unrealistic to me and turned the wedding into just another awkward scene.

Bella’s ubiquitous lack of emotion came through in the rest of the movie, as well.  I can’t even complain about it anymore.  It’s just so bad and takes away any concern you might have for her character.  How can you care about a character who doesn’t excite any compassion in you?

Of the J/E/B trio, I’d have to say that Jacob is my favorite character.  He acts in a way that is at least familiar to the rest of us.  Which is to say, he displays the emotions of a normal human being.  Let’s not mince words though, his imprinting in this movie was slightly creepy.  Never mind the fact that he was in love with the mother of his new love, this new love interest is a baby.  I know there is an explanation which is supposed to clear the way and make it okay, but I can’t get over the fact that they are showing romantic attachment between adults and children.  Too icky.

One of the more disturbing things in this movie is the amount of blood and gore, especially when you compare it to the previous movies.  This one blows all the others out of the water.  Bella’s nightmare the night before the wedding is very disturbing.  Also, the part in which Bella finally goes into labor is very bloody and rather grotesque.  I tell you this not to dissuade you from watching the movie, but to warn you that it might not be appropriate for younger viewers or those with a touchy stomach.

There are also some very suggestive scenes between Edward and Bella.  While the nudity is tastefully done, it doesn’t leave a lot to the imagination.  I wouldn’t be comfortable with my preteen watching those scenes.

While I enjoyed the movie, the plot was a bit simple to make it terribly satisfying.  Essentially it’s the conundrum of a girl getting pregnant and how that is dealt with.  If you’re not into relationship drama, this movie could quite possibly drive you insane.

I recommend this movie to ladies in their teens and older who enjoy a good paranormal romance.  If you are a fan of the Twilight series, I think you will enjoy this movie.

Possible Objections:

  • Violence & gore
  • Lots of blood (especially during the delivery)
  • Suggestive sexual content & partial nudity (though you don’t actually see the private bits)

Rated: PG-13

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden

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Title: The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden

Notable: Newbery Honor book, 1961

Premise:

Chester cricket is accidentally transported from his rural Connecticut home to the Times Square subway station in New York City.  A friendly cat and mouse help Chester fit into this new and foreign environment, and a boy named Mario Bellini adopts Chester as his new pet.  Chester is instrumental in saving the Bellini’s struggling newspaper stand.

My thoughts:

This book was completely new to me and I’m happy to report that it was an enjoyable read.  The story is very basic, but the animal characters are charming and really the focus of the story.

My two favorite characters are Chester cricket (of course) and Sai Fong, the Chinese gentleman.  Chester is so good-natured and you can’t help but feel sorry for him.  This poor little country cricket finds himself dumped in the big, loud, dirty city without a soul to help him.  Thank goodness Tucker mouse and Harry cat step in!  It’s fun to imagine the scenes when Chester is giving his concerts in the subway and all of the people are standing there rapt.  The child in me wants to go find a cricket now just to listen to their song.  (Incidentally, we had a cricket infestation in our house several years ago, and I can assure you that it’s not too fun hunting loud crickets in the middle of the night when all you want is to get some sleep.)

When we are first introduced to Sai Fong, the man who owns a Chinese laundry and trinket shop, I was afraid that it was going to be another stereotypical portrayal of a Chinese person, hinting at our American superiority.  Thankfully that was not the case.  Sai Fong is a lovable character who is ecstatic about Mario’s lucky pet cricket.  He helps Mario get a cage for his cricket (really a beautiful pagoda), has them over for dinner, and supplies Mario with mulberry leaves to feed Chester.  Although his character doesn’t step outside the bounds of the typical Chinese character, he is presented with a loving eye.

Overall, I enjoyed this book.  Though it has not become one of my favorites, I still think it’s a great chapter book for kids.  The story would need a bit more than pure fluff to put it on my list of cherished books.

I recommend The Cricket in Times Square to elementary-age kids or as a cute family read-aloud.

Possible Objections:

  • Chinese man’s language is garbled and spelled phonetically (if you’re particularly sensitive, you might find this offensive)

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Eclipse — Movie 2010

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Last night I watched Eclipse, the movie adaptation of the book by the same name!

The vampires and werewolves of Forks, Washington form an uneasy alliance when they face a threat from an unknown source in nearby Seattle.  Bella is once again in the sights of a malevolent supernatural creature, and both the Cullens and Quileutes put their lives on the line to protect her.  Edward and Bella come to a new understanding in their relationship, and Jacob continues to vie for Bella’s hand.  If you want to know more about what I thought of the book, check out my book review.

My thoughts:

I can’t believe how long it took me to get my hands on this movie.  I wanted to review it when the book was still fresh in my mind.  Unfortunately, I probably missed some of the differences between the book and the movie because of the long interim.

The movie jumps right in with the action going on in Seattle.  I must say that they amped up the vampire on human violence in this movie.  The previous movies have fairly quick and non-gruesome killing scenes, but this one takes it to the next level with the newborn vampires attacking people.  I was startled and kind of looked away during the part with the mauling and the burning car.

Edward and Bella seemed to have more of a natural relationship; not quite as sappy as in the two previous movies.  That was a relief, however, there really didn’t seem to be a lot of chemistry between them in this movie.  Am I the only one who thought that?  It was nice to see them come to a concrete decision in their relationship.  Bella’s demand for after their marriage seems a bit petty and hormonal, though.  Such a teenager!

I really liked Jacob in this movie.  He was more mature and intentional in his pursuit of Bella.  He genuinely loves her and offers her a life which any woman would prize.  It’s too bad she loves Edward more.  You can’t help but feel bad for Jacob and root for him as the underdog.

It was also nice to get more of Jasper’s and Rosalie’s backstories.  Rosalie’s story was particularly disturbing, and I’m glad that they didn’t get any more explicit in that scene.  It was bad enough as it was.

Overall, I enjoyed this movie adaptation, but I still prefer the book.  There were some very cool parts–the vamp/wolf chase scene with Victoria, and the Cullen and Quileute training scenes in particular.  There were a few scenes which were just okay and I found my mind wandering and a yawn escaping my lips.  All in all, it’s not my favorite Twilight movie.  Sorry!

I recommend this movie to ladies in their teens and older who enjoy a good paranormal romance.  If you are a fan of the Twilight series, I think you will enjoy this movie.

Possible Objections:

  • Violence (including a strong suggestion of sexual violence)

Rated: PG-13

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Eliot

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Title: Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Eliot

Premise:

Learn about different kinds of cats and their occupations in verse form!  This is a collection of feline-themed poems which tell readers about the exploits and foibles of Jellicle cats.  One is a magician, one a criminal mastermind, and more.  Whatever their occupation, you’re sure to find a favorite!

My thoughts:

If you are a cat-lover, then you need to read this slim book of poems!  It’s so much fun and really celebrates the quirkiness and idiosyncrasies of our feline friends.  The length is quite short as well, so you shouldn’t have any trouble polishing it off in a day.

I have difficulty choosing a favorite poem because they’re all so good, but I’d have to say that Mungojerrie and Rumpelteazer is my all-time fav.  (Actually we named one of our cats Rumpelteazer.)  Rum Tum Tugger comes in a close second.  Hubby says he prefers Skimbleshanks.  My son loves Mr. Mistoffelees.  When he was younger he watched Cats all the time and when it got to the end of that song, he’d take a flying leap off the couch.  He was also scared of Macavity, but don’t tell him I told you so.

The musical Cats (which I absolutely love) is based on this book.  If you’re familiar with the songs from Cats, it will be very difficult to read the book without starting to sing the words.  I’m not sure if that’s a good or bad thing.  Even if you do try to sing through the book, you’ll get muddled up because it’s not copied verbatim.

Throughout the book there are playful and whimsical drawings by Edward Gorey.  They’re somewhat simple, but very well done and really show the character of the various cats.

If it weren’t for the racial comments against the Chinese, this book would have gotten a 5-star rating.  It’s too bad that stuff has to be in there.

I recommend Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats to anybody who loves cats.  Because of the few racial comments, I don’t recommend it for young children, but it could work as a family read-aloud (with the offensive bits left out, of course).


Possible Objections:

  • A racial epithet against the Chinese & a couple of verses that talk about the “Heathen Chinese”

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

 

WHICH CAT IS YOUR FAVORITE?

Miss Bianca in the Orient by Margery Sharp

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Title: Miss Bianca in the Orient by Margery Sharp

Premise:

When the Ambassador from the Orient visits, Miss Bianca learns of an unfortunate page boy who is condemned to death for sneezing in the Ranee’s sherbet.  Miss Bianca and Bernard travel to “the Orient” to try and save the poor boy.  But will their plan succeed when nobody seems to know anything about him or his whereabouts?

My thoughts:

I just finished this book tonight and I came away disappointed.  I remember reading it when I was younger, but I must not have been quite as critical back then.  There were some things that I picked up on this time through which really put a bad taste in my mouth.

Let’s start with the good, though.  I love Miss Bianca and Bernard.  They have such lovely personalities and work very well as a team.  Bernard’s devotion to Miss Bianca is so, so sweet.  The premise of the story is also promising.  Our intrepid duo travels to “the Orient” to rescue an unfortunate page boy who has been sentenced to death.  The characters we meet in the palace court are interesting and fairly well developed.  While the plot is very simple, it’s quite adequate for an elementary chapter book.  And the illustrations by Erik Blegvad are very nicely done.

On to the bad.  Throughout the book, the language referring to “the Orient” is exceptionally outdated and imprecise.  Where exactly is “the Orient”?  Why can’t we name a specific country with a specific language?  What exactly is “Oriental writing”?  What does it mean to be “Orientally thoughtless”?  It doesn’t take a genius to pick up on the idea that the writer views “the Orient” as a generic group of people living in the East whose way of life is inferior to that of the West.  Based on the details contained in the book, I believe the author had India in mind as the setting, but it’s never actually stated.  Are we trying to make our children stupid by teaching them that the entirety of the East is one homogeneous and backward group of people?

Quite frankly, I won’t be keeping this book around the house because I would be mortified to have my children read the book and start talking about “the Orient” or “Oriental writing”.  I would rather they learn about specific countries, languages, and people groups.

I don’t recommend Miss Bianca in the Orient to children because of what I perceive as subtle prejudice.  However, if you’re an adult fan of Miss Bianca and Bernard, you might want to read this book to round out your knowledge of all of their adventures.


Possible Objections:

  • Prejudice against “Orientals”

Rating: 2 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Pippa Mouse by Betty Boegehold

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Title: Pippa Mouse by Betty Boegehold

Premise:

Join Pippa mouse and her friends, Weber Duck, Gray Bird and Ripple Squirrel, as they take part in some fun and wholesome adventures!  The friends build nests, work together, play on the ice and celebrate Christmas together.

My thoughts:

I absolutely adore this book!  It is so fun, cute and innocent that you can’t keep from liking it.  Pippa mouse is a playful and inquisitive young mouse who likes to get others to join in her adventures.  Each story features one of her short adventures.

The overall story is very simple, reminding me of the Frog and Toad books by Arnold Lobel.  They have that same story form and wonderful drawings which are just as integral to the story as the text.

The illustrations are by Cyndy Szekeres and are done in nature-centric 70’s style.  They are thoroughly charming and make the animals look so cute you could just gobble them up.  Just seeing the drawings of Pippa Mouse kind of makes you fall in love with her.  🙂

I recommend Pippa Mouse to young readers, and to families as an excellent read-aloud story.  I think it will become a new family favorite.

 

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Bernie Sanders Guide to Political Revolution by Bernie Sanders

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A special thank-you to Macmillan and Goodreads for providing an ARC for me to review!

Title: Bernie Sanders Guide to Political Revolution by Bernie Sanders

Premise:

The focus of this book is to share Bernie Sanders’ views on the major political issues of the day and the ways he would address them.  He seeks to inform readers about the broken policies and practices in the areas of a livable wage, taxes, Wall Street, health care, higher education, immigration, climate change, and policing and criminal justice.

My thoughts:

I think that this book accomplishes exactly what it set out to do: share Bernie’s political views and solutions with a younger generation.  The text and explanations are clear and concise, breaking down the issues into language which most young people would understand.  If you’re older or looking for a particularly in-depth analysis and explanations, you’ll be disappointed, but remember that’s not the aim of this book.

I had heard Bernie’s views leading up to the election of course, but this is a quick and easy way to learn about his political views.  The problems he talks about in each area are enlightening and it’s good to be informed about the problems our country is facing and why.  Quite frankly, I got angry and/or depressed after reading each chapter.  There is so much injustice in this country, especially being perpetuated by corrupt big business and political powers.  The rich really do have a racket going on in this country and the little people are at a major disadvantage in righting those wrongs.  So, I wouldn’t recommend reading this right before bed because you’ll probably get angry and sit there fuming in bed while you should be sleeping.

I think Bernie’s aim is not to get people depressed and feeling helpless, but to encourage them (especially young people) to get involved in politics.  While it may seem overwhelming because there are so many areas of corruption, we can each choose one area that we feel strongly about and focus our energies and efforts there.  One person cannot do everything, but each one of us can do something.  A lot of little people working to make change will add up to large changes in our society and political system.  I think Bernie Sanders is a politician with heart who keeps the well-being of everyday people in mind.  That’s a rare thing today.

I recommend Bernie Sanders Guide to Political Revolution to young people who would like to learn more about the major political issues of the day, and see how Sanders would address those issues.  It’s also appropriate for adults who are looking for a basic, concise book about Sanders’ views.

A favorite quote:

“I believe that the government has a moral responsibility to provide for the vulnerable–the children, the elderly, the sick, and the disabled.  But I do not believe that the government should burden taxpayers with financially supporting profitable corporations owned by some of the wealthiest people in this country.  That’s absurd.”  (p. 10)

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

The Littles and the Big Storm by John Peterson

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Title: The Littles and the Big Storm by John Peterson

Premise:

When the Bigg family goes on vacation, it is up to the Littles to take care of the house when a big storm bears down on them.  Can they keep the basement from flooding and ruining the furnace?  And what kind of creature is leaving mysterious clues around the house?

My thoughts:

I must say that this Littles book is not my favorite in the series.  While there are parts of the story which are cute and fun, the Littles never leave their house and the adventure seems a little lacking.  That’s only my personal opinion, so take it with a grain of salt.

The storm is what really provides the excitement in this story.  Because the Biggs are away from home, the Littles have to figure out how to solve the problem of the flooding basement, and that ends up being pretty dramatic.  I love imagining them on their raft floating across the perilous water-filled basement.

The other mystery which serves as a subplot throughout the story (which I’m not going to give away), ends in a rather anticlimactic way.  My son and I read the book together, and we were guessing that there was some kind of animal loose in the house.  You’ll have to read it to find out if we were right or wrong.

I recommend The Littles and the Big Storm to children who are beginning to read chapter books.  It’s also a must-read for Littles fans and would make a fun family read-aloud, too!

 

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Printable “The Phantom of the Opera” Word Find Puzzle – Characters

Please enjoy my character word find for The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux!

Simply click on the link below and either print, or save it to your computer and then print.  Enjoy!

“The Phantom of the Opera” Word Find Puzzle – Characters

Books We Own: Terry Pratchett

My husband introduced me to the wonderful realm of Discworld some years ago.  I had never heard of Terry Pratchett and at first his books struck me as somewhat odd.  What exactly were these books?  They were definitely fantasy, but unlike any fantasy I had ever read.  I soon discovered that this was a magical and wondrous world, and I wanted to discover all of its delightful secrets.  If you are a fan of English humor and fantasy books, you will love the Discworld novels.  They are simply brilliant!

We are in the process of trying to build a complete set of Pratchett’s books, but they are not as easy to come by here in the States.  Also, I like to add to my book collection by finding the odd book at a thrift sale or Goodwill.  It’s like finding hidden treasure.  The few times I have found one of Pratchett’s books at Goodwill, I’ve wanted to start running through the aisles, waving the book around for everyone to see and shouting out my exultation.  Sweet, sweet victory!  I refrain, though.  Who wants to get carted off by the police because you got overly excited about a book, y’know?

**You can see a slideshow of the books at the end of this post.

♥ = we own the book

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Discworld Novels in Order:

  1. The Color of Magic
  2. The Light Fantastic
  3. Equal Rites
  4. Mort
  5. Sourcery
  6. Wyrd Sisters
  7. Pyramids
  8. Guards! Guards!
  9. Eric
  10. Moving Pictures
  11. Reaper Man
  12. Witches Abroad
  13. Small Gods
  14. Lords and Ladies
  15. Men at Arms
  16. Soul Music
  17. Interesting Times
  18. Maskerade
  19. Feet of Clay
  20. Hogfather
  21. Jingo
  22. The Last Continent
  23. Carpe Jugulum
  24. The Fifth Elephant
  25. The Truth
  26. Thief of Time
  27. The Last Hero: A Discworld Fable
  28. The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents
  29. Night Watch
  30. The Wee Free Men
  31. Monstrous Regiment
  32. A Hat Full of Sky
  33. Going Postal
  34. Thud!
  35. Wintersmith
  36. Making Money
  37. Unseen Academicals
  38. I Shall Wear Midnight
  39. Snuff
  40. Raising Steam
  41. The Shepherd’s Crown

For Younger Readers:

  1. Dodger
  2. Dodger’s Guide to London
  3. Dragons at Crumbling Castle
  4. Johnny and the Bomb
  5. Johnny and the Dead
  6. Nation
  7. Only You Can Save Mankind
  8. The Abominable Snowman
  9. The Bromeliad Trilogy (Truckers, Diggers, Wings)
  10. The Carpet People
  11. The Witch’s Vacuum Cleaner
  12. Where’s My Cow?

Other Titles:

  1. A Blink of the Screen
  2. A Slip of the Keyboard
  3. A Tourist Guide to Lancre: A Discworld Mapp (also by Stephen Briggs)
  4. Death’s Domain: A Discworld Mapp
  5. Good Omens (also by Neil Gaiman) ♥
  6. Guards! Guards!: The Play (also by Stephen Briggs)
  7. Maskerade: The Play (also by Stephen Briggs)
  8. Mort: The Play (also by Stephen Briggs)
  9. Mrs. Bradshaw’s Handbook: To Travelling Upon the Ankh-Morpork & Sto Plains Hygienic Railway
  10. Nanny Ogg’s Cookbook
  11. Seriously Funny: The Endlessly Quotable Terry Pratchett
  12. Shaking Hands with Death
  13. Small Gods: A Discworld Graphic Novel (also by Ray Friesen)
  14. Strata
  15. The Art of Discworld (also by Paul Kidby) ♥
  16. The Compleat Ankh-Morpork: City Guide
  17. The Compleat Discworld Atlas
  18. The Dark Side of the Sun
  19. The Discworld Mapp (also by Stephen Briggs) ♥
  20. The Folklore of Discworld (also by Jacqueline Simpson)
  21. The Long Earth
  22. The Long War
  23. The Long Mars
  24. The Long Utopia
  25. The Long Cosmos
  26. The New Discworld Companion (also by Stephen Briggs) ♥
  27. The Pratchett Portfolio
  28. The Science of Discworld (also by Ian Stewart & Jack Cohen)
  29. The Science of Discworld II: The Globe (also by Ian Stewart & Jack Cohen)
  30. The Science of Discworld III: Darwin’s Watch (also by Ian Stewart & Jack Cohen)
  31. The Science of Discworld IV: Judgment Day (also by Ian Stewart & Jack Cohen)
  32. The Streets of Ankh-Morpork Mapp (also by Stephen Briggs) ♥
  33. The Unadulterated Cat
  34. The Unseen University Cut-Out Book (also by Alan Batley & Bernard Pearson)
  35. The Wit and Wisdom of Discworld
  36. The World of Poo
  37. Turtle Recall: The Discworld Companion. . .So Far (also by Stephen Briggs)
  38. Wyrd Sisters: The Play (also by Stepehn Briggs)

Discworld Books by Other Authors:

  1. The Authorized Terry Pratchett’s Discworld Magazine from SFX ♥

 

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I just noticed that my camera seems to have a scratch on the lens.  That’s awesome.  😦

Doctor Who and the Day of the Daleks by Terrance Dicks

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Title: Doctor Who and the Day of the Daleks (#1) by Terrance Dicks

Premise:

The Doctor and Jo Grant find themselves caught up in an assassination attempt when men from the future come back in time to kill Sir Reginald Styles.  The earth’s future is destined for domination and ruination by the Daleks, and the guerrilla group hopes to stop that from every happening.  Can The Doctor set earth back on its proper course of history before it’s too late?

My thoughts:

I found this book and most of the rest of my Doctor Who collection one day while browsing at Goodwill.  Apparently somebody had offloaded a whole Doctor Who collection at the thrift store.  I was over the moon!  There were several of these early Doctor who novelizations, but I just now got to reading one of them.  So many books, so little time…

Now, let’s be real here.  Anything featuring Doctor Who automatically has a soft spot in my heart.  That doesn’t mean that I would read drivel if it had The Doctor’s name on it, but it does give me warm fuzzies just seeing his name.  When I picked up this book I thought that it might be one of those sloppily produced fan fiction books.  I was very pleasantly surprised, however, to discover that the story was very well written.  It’s not that the plot is amazingly complex (it follows the typical action sequence of a Doctor Who episode), but the writing itself was really well executed.  That was refreshing and gratifying.  Thank you, Mr. Dicks, for your writing talents.

This story features a dystopian future earth, which is always a fun concept to explore.  In this case, it is the Daleks who have taken advantage of the earth’s misfortunes and exploited it for its resources.  Their flunkies, the Ogrons, are an impressive, if intellectually uninteresting species.  They’re the ultimate henchmen, really.

There is one issue with the book, which I could probably figure out if I did some research on the evolution of the Doctor Who story.  In the beginning of the book it is stated that The Doctor stole the Tardis from the Time Lords because he was no longer content to sit around and watch injustice played out across the galaxy.  Apparently when this book was written the story was that the Time Lords were still alive and that The Doctor was a sort of renegade Time Lord.  We know that later in the series the story changes to the annihilation of the Time Lords in the Time Wars with the Daleks.  In that version The Doctor is an unwitting survivor who no longer has a home or people to call his own.  That’s quite a difference in story and I’ll have to figure out when it changed, but right now I need to go take a shower.  😉

Update: I have since figured out the explanation for the change in story and it all worked itself out.  🙂

I recommend Doctor Who and the Day of the Daleks to all of you Doctor Who fans out there.  If you’re a fan, I’d say that these classic novelizations are a must-read.  If you’re not a fan, you probably won’t see the merit in this book.


Possible Objections:

  • Some violence

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

September Unhaul & Giveaway — CLOSED

My Bookshelf Giveaways:

*Read my reviews by clicking on the titles above.

Enter by clicking on the link following each title.  The giveaways are open internationally (except for the Twilight series) to participants 18 years and older and will end on September 30, 2017.  The LOTR Battle Game book giveaway will stay open until there are an adequate number of entries (at least 10).  Winners will be announced on my blog and contacted through email.  Good luck!