New Moon — Movie 2009

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Last night I watched New Moon, the movie adaptation of the book by the same name!

After a disastrous birthday party in which Bella is almost killed, Edward decides that it would be safer for her if he were not a part of her life.  Abandoned by her true love, Bella is swallowed by depression.  Her friend Jacob Black starts to bring a little light back into her life, though he is hiding a secret of his own.  And though Edward tried, Bella is still in danger.  Will Edward and Bella be reunited, or will Bella fall for her best friend, Jacob?  If you want to know more about what I thought of the book, check out my book review.

My thoughts:

Overall, I would say that this movie is on par with the previous one, Twilight.  It’s a must-see if you’re a fan of the series, and an okay movie if you like paranormal romance in general.

Let’s just jump right into my criticisms.  I really like the look of the Cullen family, but especially in the scenes where the whole family is interacting together, they are way too unnatural.  That is rather a disappointment because in the books you get a sense that this is a family that is warm, loving, and really watches out for each member.  For some reason that warmth and family atmosphere did not translate through in the movie.  That’s too bad.

My second criticism is over the slight changes made to the original story.  In the movie they make it seem like Carlisle doubts whether vampires have souls, when in the book he actually does have faith in an afterlife.  Also, they manufactured the scene where Victoria is hunting Charlie, and Harry Clearwater saves him by essentially sacrificing himself.  Maybe they wanted to make Harry’s death tie into the vampire theme a little more, instead of somebody dying of natural causes?  There were several other changes made to the story, most of them seemingly slight, but they add up over time to produce a story which kind of rankles if you’re a big fan of the book.  I’m not a huge fan of changing a story when translating it to film, if there doesn’t seem to be a good reason for it.

Finally, my biggest criticism is how they changed the romantic tension between Jacob and Bella.  The book is quite clear that Jacob is very interested in Bella in a romantic way, but she never seriously entertains the idea of getting involved with him romantically.  All of those almost-kisses in the movie are completely made up, and I think it complicates their relationship in a way that isn’t true to the original story.

There are also some things which I really liked!  Edward is still sultry and amazing.  I enjoy his acting style and think he really nailed the sexy vampire thing.  Jacob is amazing, too!  He is warm, intense and down-to-earth–just like Jacob is supposed to be.  Finally, the werewolves were very cool!  I pictured them a bit larger in my head, but they were still impressive.  I love the whole new mystical side which is added to the story with the wolves.  Grudgingly, I’ll add that Stewart displayed more convincing emotions in this movie than in the previous one.  Perhaps she’s just a very subdued kind of person.

I recommend this movie to ladies in their teens and older who enjoy a good paranormal romance.  If you are a fan of the Twilight series, I think you would enjoy this movie.

Possible Objections:

  • Violence

Rated: PG-13

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

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Twilight — Movie 2008

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Let’s talk about Twilight, the movie adaptation of the book by the same name!

Bella Swan moves in with her dad, starting over in the town of Forks, Washington.  There she encounters the enigmatic Edward Cullen and they fall for each other.  However, Edward is hiding a dangerous secret that could put their relationship in jeopardy.  Will Bella decide to stay with Edward, and if so, will she be safe?  If you want to know more about what I thought of the book, check out my book review.

My thoughts:

So I watched Twilight the other night and decided I should review it before moving on to the next movie in the series.  Unfortunately, I remembered it as being better than it was.  Sad face.

I love the story overall, but there were a few things in the movie that I didn’t care for.  The first thing I have to mention is Edward and Bella’s first interaction in Biology class.  It was bad.  Just bad.  They both spoke and acted like they were a bit slow mentally.  I get it that this was their first real conversation, so it was bound to be awkward, but why make it downright painful to watch?

This brings me to my second criticism.  Robert Pattinson does okay in the displaying-real-emotions department, even sneaking in some humor at times.  However, Kristen Stewart did not pull it off at all.  Her emotions were flat, and sometimes completely unbelievable (as in her response in the hospital scene when Edward talks about leaving).  Stewart’s lack of real emotions grated on me throughout the movie.  Also, there were too many “slow stares” between Edward and Bella.  Just staring at each other does not a passionate scene make.

On a more positive note, there were some things that I absolutely loved about the movie.  It’s fun to see such a fantastical story come to life in front of your eyes.  I really enjoyed the scene where the Cullens are playing baseball.  It was a nice way to showcase their abilities.  Also, Charlie, Billy Black and Jacob all did a fine job in their roles.  It really makes a difference when you have good supporting actors.  I couldn’t get over how young Jacob looked–like a little boy!

I recommend this movie to ladies in their teens and older who enjoy a good paranormal romance.  If you are a fan of the Twilight series, I think you would enjoy this movie.

Possible Objections:

  • Violence

Rated: PG-13

Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer

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Title: Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer

Notable: Book #3 in the Twilight series

Premise:

The vampires and werewolves of Forks, Washington face a new threat when Victoria seeks revenge against Edward and Bella.  Though werewolves and vampires are natural enemies, they will have to work together if they want to save their loved ones from the mayhem which is swiftly approaching.  The conflict and constant tug-of-war between Edward and Jacob over Bella finally comes to a head, with Bella making her final choice.

My thoughts:

If you love drama and angst, then this is the book for you!  I just finished Eclipse this evening, and it definitely left me feeling sad.  The ending is so tragic and even though I know that everything will turn out alright in the end, I still feel so sorry for poor Jacob.

It seems to me that this story revolves less around action and more around relationships and feelings.  It completely capitalizes on the love triangle between Jacob, Bella and Edward.  Their feelings, motivations, guilt trips, selfish actions, fights, and hissy fits are all on glorious display for the reader to bask in.  It feels like watching a soap opera from up close.  Personally, I would have liked a bit less of the angst, squabbling and indecision, but I can see how it would appeal to a younger audience.

The steaminess quotient definitely jumped up a notch with this book, compared to the first two.  With the talk about marriage, Edward and Bella are more forward in their physical relationship than they have been in the past, though there isn’t anything explicit.  Even Jacob gets his turn to smolder in this book!

The relationship between Edward and Bella is still one of (what I think is) unhealthy co-dependency.  I get that young people like this idea that there is one person out there who is your soul mate, and that it would kill you if you had to part with them, but I can’t keep my brain suspended in the clouds like a teenager can.  My mind craves a bit more realism in their relationship, and for their characters to realize that you can’t completely depend on someone else to define yourself or your happiness in life.  Sigh…I know that won’t be coming in the next book, though.

Despite that criticism, I loved the book and couldn’t put it down.  It’s just so juicy and full of drama!  I think the conflict and uncertainty in the relationships makes the story so engrossing, and that’s what makes it so addictive.

I recommend Eclipse to all the ladies out there who enjoy a good romantic story with a bit of danger thrown in.  I think it’s best suited to teens and up, as things get a bit violent, especially the farther you progress in the series.


Possible Objections:

  • Violence
  • More intimate scenes & discussion of sex after marriage; also a sexual assault is alluded to
  • A few uses of the d-word

 Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

 

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

New Moon by Stephenie Meyer

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Title: New Moon by Stephenie Meyer

Notable: Book #2 in the Twilight series

Premise:

Edward has left Bella, thinking that she will be safe if he isn’t a part of her life.  Bella just can’t cope without him though, until Jacob Black brings some sunshine back into her life.  Just when life is starting to settle into a new normal, all heck breaks loose.  The vampire Victoria seeks revenge for the killing of her mate, hikers go missing in the woods, some kind of giant animals are on the prowl, and Jacob is avoiding Bella.

My thoughts:

Once I get reading these books, I can’t put them down!  This one took me about a day and a half to read.

I like this book even more than the first one!  I think it’s because Bella and Jacob’s interactions are much more down-to-earth and comfortably familiar than when she interacts with Edward.  Her relationship with Jacob is based on friendship and that’s simply more satisfying to read about.

I was also fascinated with the werewolf culture and getting to know those characters better.  Jacob Black is, of course, a wonderful and likeable character, but he’s backed up by others at La Push whom I’d like to know more about, as well.

The part where Bella and Alice go after Edward is…different.  It almost seems like a different story altogether because the vampires are so very absent from most of the rest of the book.  I think their reunion is a bit unbelievable; Bella just a little too needy and ready to forgive.  If I were in her shoes I’d be stinking angry.  I like the bit about her powers though, especially since I know how that will play out in a later book.

The way that things end with Bella and Jacob is very sad, but since I already know the story line, I’m not too heartbroken.  It just seems like poor Jake gets the short end of the stick.  He did what was right and was a faithful friend and in the end he gets slighted.

A favorite quote: “I was like a lost moon–my planet destroyed in some cataclysmic, disaster-movie scenario of desolation–that continued, nevertheless, to circle in a tight little orbit around the empty space left behind, ignoring the laws of gravity.”  (p. 201)
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I recommend New Moon to all the ladies out there who enjoy a good romantic story with a bit of danger thrown in.  I think it’s best suited to teens and up, as things get a bit violent, especially the farther you progress in the series.

Possible Objections:

  • Violence

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

 

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

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Title: Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

Notable: Book #1 in the Twilight series

Premise:

When her mother remarries, Bella Swan moves back in with her dad in the tiny, morose town of Forks, Washington.  She thinks life there will be dull until she meets the enigmatic and gorgeous Edward Cullen.  He fascinates Bella and she can’t help but try to unravel the mystery surrounding him.  To her great astonishment, she finds that he is equally intrigued by her.  But will their irresistible attraction end in heartache or joy?

My thoughts:

I had already read this book several years ago.  I was absolutely engrossed by it back then, and it still keeps me riveted today.  Even when I knew what was going to happen, I was still on the edge of my seat.  I guess that’s the sign of a good story!

I don’t know how Meyer did it, but she concocted a thoroughly engrossing and satisfying love story with Edward and Bella.  I think it might have something to do with the forbidden nature of their relationship, and the way that they ease into each new step very slowly.  The romantic build-up is quite slow and of course that’s like sweet torture for the reader.

Meyer’s writing style is really to my taste, as well.  Just like J.K. Rowling kept her Harry Potter stories going along at a nicely measured pace, Meyer does the same.  You’re propelled quickly through the story without it feeling like any kind of burden or work on your part.  I’ll confess that this series is one of my favorite contemporary romance stories.

I only have a couple of criticisms.  The first one is really related to my own stage of life right now.  Since I’m older and well past my teenage ideas of all-consuming love, that aspect of the story is a little annoying to me.  I’m more into the idea of steady love which is based on friendship, respect and trust.  I’m sure most preteens and teens swoon over the I’ll-die-without-you love sentiments contained in Twilight, though.  My second criticism is that towards the end of the book (and throughout the rest of the series) Edward and Bella get a bit annoying in their dialogue.  You can only read, “I can’t live without you” and similar sentiments so many times before your mind rebels.  You want to shout at them to grow up a bit and say something more original or have a normal conversation.  Even with those couple of criticisms though, I love the story.

I recommend Twilight to all the ladies out there who enjoy a good romantic story with a bit of danger thrown in.  I think it’s best suited to teens and up, as things get a bit violent, especially the farther you progress in the series.

Possible Objections:

  • Violence

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

OTHER TWILIGHT POSTS:

 

August Unhaul & Giveaway — CLOSED

My Bookshelf Giveaways:

*Read my reviews by clicking on the titles above.

Enter by clicking on the links following each title.  The giveaways are open internationally to participants 18 years and older and will end on August 31, 2017.  Winners will be announced on my blog and contacted through email.  Good luck!

The Mists of Avalon Giveaway — CLOSED

Giveaway 6

I’m starting something new in terms of my book blog giveaways.  In an effort to share the books I’ve read and keep my own bookshelf under control, I will start giving away some of the books which I’ve already read and reviewed.  This month I’ll be offering three such books.  They will be given away separately so that you can sign up for only the books you’d actually like to read.

My Bookshelf Giveaway: The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

Read my review here

Enter by following the link below.  It’s open internationally to participants 18 years and older and will end on May 31, 2017.  The winner will be announced on my blog and contacted through email.  Good luck!

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Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

HP Prisoner of Azkaban

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Title: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

Premise:

In Harry’s third year at Hogwarts all heck breaks loose!  Notorious criminal Sirius Black has broken out of Azkaban prison and is bent on seeking revenge.  Meanwhile, Harry, Ron and Hermione are buried in schoolwork as they prepare to take their OWLs (final exams).  Quidditch is just as drama-filled as ever, and Harry learns to defend himself against Dementors–the terrifying Azkaban guards who are keeping guard at Hogwarts.

My thoughts:

This is another wonderfully rollicking Harry Potter story that embodies the elements of fun and adventure.  The Quidditch scenes are just as harrowing as in previous books; the school drama just as satisfying; the mischief just as exciting!

With this book, however, the series seems to have taken a turn into more mature themes.  Not anything inappropriate, but more mature in terms of emotions and motivation.  It deals with themes of hatred, revenge, betrayal, and how people react in adverse circumstances.  Harry really comes to a crisis point in his thinking when he understands how fully somebody hurt him and has to decide whether to embrace his hatred or let it go.  I like that kids get to explore those more complex emotional issues in this story.

The story itself feels like it’s more complex and well-planned than the previous two.  The plot is more involved and interconnected, with some decidedly clever bits that make you say, “Oh, now I get it!“.  I don’t want to give anything away, but Hermione’s “tool” is an awesome plot device.

I love Lupin and wish that he were a bigger part of the story.  It seems like there is so much about his character and history that is only hinted at and I’d love to get a fuller look at that.  One character who I think is portrayed quite differently in the movie is Crookshanks.  In the book he’s much more intelligent and plays a greater role in the story.  The movie Crookshanks is mostly just an ill-tempered cat.  It’s too bad he was dumbed-down for the movie.

Finally, it was very satisfying to learn more about the history of Harry’s parents and friends.  It helps round out the story and characters, and really adds a depth of understanding to everything that happens in the series.  If there’s one thing that J.K. Rowling does well, it’s writing well-developed characters.

I highly recommend Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban to kids from elementary school up through teens.  It’s also a great family read-aloud.  It’s definitely a family-favorite at our house!

Possible Objections:

  • 2 uses of the d-word
  • 1 use of the b-word (though it’s used in reference to a female dog)

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling

HP Chamber of Secrets

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Title: Harry Potter and The Chamber Of Secrets by J.K. Rowling

Premise:

Harry Potter is back for his second year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry!  Don’t get too comfortable, though–danger lurks yet again for our dauntless hero and his friends.  Someone is determined to rid the school of students who are from non-wizarding families.  Can Harry, Ron and Hermione stop them before somebody is truly hurt?

My thoughts:

This book is possibly my favorite Harry Potter novel (though I’ll have to go through and compare all of them again to judge fairly).  The story is fun and charming; the characters are engaging and still fresh; the plot elements are fun and adventurous!  If ever there was a satisfying adventure story written for children–this is it!

Chamber of Secrets really capitalizes on the cohesive friendship of Harry, Ron and Hermione, where the first book only touched the surface.  In this book the friends really function as a team and figure out how they work best together.  Also, Hermione’s character became much less annoying and much more fleshed out.

Speaking of characters, I think that this book really did an admirable job of bringing in some very interesting and entertaining new ones–Professor Lockhart, Moaning Myrtle, and even Dobby.  An author should never underestimate the power of good supporting characters, and this story sure does deliver on that front.

As for the story line, it is so much fun–a flying car, the Forbidden Forest, the magical creatures, and the final scene in the Chamber of Secrets–who wouldn’t love it?

If you are familiar with the movie adaptation of this book, you will notice that the book and the movie are nearly identical.  It almost feels like you’re reading the screenplay.  Of course I know that the book came first, but I can picture the movie scenes in my head.  It’s a bit strange.

I highly recommend Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets to kids all the way from elementary school up through teens.  It’s also a great family read-aloud.  The story is timeless and would appeal to many ages.

A Favorite quote:

“’So Dobby stopped us from getting on the train and broke your arm….’  He shook his head.  ‘You know what, Harry?  If he doesn’t stop trying to save your life he’s going to kill you.’”  (p. 184)

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

HP Sorcerers Stone

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I read the Harry Potter series years ago, though not when they first came out.  I had a thing back then about reading books which were being talked about non-stop.  The more someone told me, you have to read this book, the less I wanted to read it.  I finally caved and ended up absolutely falling in love with the books.  Now my kids are starting to read the Harry Potter series and I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to revisit them myself.  We currently have five people in our family reading through the series.  I think that’s pretty awesome!

Title: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Premise:

Harry Potter has been raised unloved and mistreated by his aunt and uncle who took him in as an infant when his parents died.  Much to his surprise, Harry finds out that he has been accepted into a school for witchcraft and wizardry, and that he is in fact quite famous for having survived an attack by a powerful wizard named Voldemort.  Follow Harry in his first-year adventures–playing quidditch, making friends, and unraveling the mystery of who is trying to steal a valuable and potentially dangerous substance from the school!

My thoughts:

It is a bit difficult to review this book objectively because I’ve seen the movie multiple times.  How do I separate my impressions of the one without talking about the other?  I’m not sure that I can.  Rest assured, I’ll go back and watch the movie to post a review of it at some later date.

I love, love, love this book!  Rowling’s style of storytelling is wonderful!  She balances the dialogue and action well, keeping the story going at just the right pace.  Her characters are well-developed and relatable.  By the end of the book they end up feeling like old friends (and enemies).

The author also has an uncanny ability to inject humor into the story–through interesting and feisty  characters, humorous situations, and the wonderful medium that is British humor.  In the books a lot more of that subtle humor comes through, which unfortunately, doesn’t always make it into the movies.  Don’t get me wrong–I love the movies, but they don’t catch the full personality of the book characters, nor the subtleties of every situation.

There was one section of the book which I thought was really hilarious, which was shortened and condensed for the movie.  The part about the lengths that Harry’s uncle Vernon goes to in trying to escape the letters is absolute gold.  I thought it was one of the funniest parts of the book.

I was also struck by how long it took for Harry and Ron to accept Hermione as one of the gang.  In the book she is much more awkward, talkative, overbearing and disliked.  I don’t think the movie was wrong in speeding up that sequence, it’s just different.  Honestly, I think I prefer the movie version of that aspect of the story because it makes Hermione more likable and less socially awkward.

Another thing I noticed was that in the scene where Harry defeats the antagonist, the person is burned.  I appreciated that they changed that for the movie because I think it would have been a bit much visually for kids to handle.

I highly recommend Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone to kids all the way from elementary school up through teens.  It’s also a great family read-aloud.  The story is timeless and would appeal to many ages.

A Favorite quote:

“’Oh, these people’s minds work in strange ways, Petunia, they’re not like you and me,’ said Uncle Vernon, trying to knock in a nail with the piece of fruitcake Aunt Petunia had just brought him.”  (p. 40)

Possible Objections:

  • 1 use of the d-word

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

The Islands of the Blessed by Nancy Farmer

islands-of-the-blessed

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I finished the final book in the Sea of Trolls trilogy–The Islands of the Blessed. I think this was the best book in the series!

Premise:

Jack and his companions must go on another quest to save his village.  A draugr, or undead spirit, has been drawn to the little town by a magical bell.  She is seeking revenge for an old wrong done to her and will harm anyone who gets in her way.  Can the Bard, Jack and Thorgil get justice for the draugr before her patience runs out and someone else is hurt?

My thoughts:

I thought this was the best book in the series!  The characters have gained more depth and the plot has become more satisfyingly complex.

It’s great seeing the old characters again–especially the Northmen.  Skakki, Olaf One-Brow’s son, is an admirable man and a great leader.  The Bard saw much more action in this story and displayed more of his impressive magical skills.  Magic is just so much fun!  Jack and Thorgil also matured in this tale and their companionship finally develops into something safe and comforting.

The fin folk, or mermaids, were a really fun and imaginative people group.  I’ve never seen the concept of merfolk developed so fully, and it was interesting to see how the author imagined their homes, social customs, etc.

It seems like this is a series that could keep going, especially since there are characters whose stories didn’t wrap up–Pega, Lucy, Brutus, Hazel, etc.  I was disappointed that Pega’s character and story line weren’t developed more.  It seemed like there was a really good story wrapped up in her existence, but in the end nothing of great importance happened to her.  Jack and Thorgil’s entrance into the School of Bards sets the scene for another series of stories, but I don’t know that any will be forthcoming.  Islands of the Blessed was published in 2009.

This is a great book for kids in the elementary to teen age range, or as a family read-aloud.  Those who are interested in Norse mythology or the early interplay of Druid and Christian religions will appreciate the subject matter most.

Possible Objections:

  • One instance of the a-word

Rating: 4 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

The Land of the Silver Apples by Nancy Farmer

land-of-silver-apples

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I finished The Land of the Silver Apples last night and am happy to report that I thoroughly enjoyed it!  It is the second book in the Sea of Trolls trilogy.

Premise:

When Lucy flubs the need-fire ceremony, the slave girl Pega must take her place in bringing pure fire from the Life Force to the community.  Something went wrong at the ceremony and Lucy’s behavior continues to worsen until her family decides to send her to St. Filian’s monastery to be cured.  Things are not what they appear at the monastery, however, and Lucy is stolen away by an elf.  Jack and his comrades must venture into the bowels of the earth to rescue Lucy and call back water to the land.  What they encounter underground is not what any of them expected and they must work together to make it out alive.

My thoughts:

This was another delightful story by Nancy Farmer!  I continue to enjoy getting to know the main character, Jack.  I love how he learns and grows, while still holding onto the traits of a typical youth.  Pega, the slave girl, is a wonderful character.  She is multi-faceted, versatile and isn’t afraid to speak her mind.  The hobgoblins are charming and remind me a bit of hobbits.

I also like what Farmer did with the elves in her story.  They have an entire back-story to explain how they came to be and why they’re so glamorous.  They hold great power and are supremely dangerous, too (like an elf/vampire cross, in a way).  These are not the elves you hear about in most other fairy tale stories.  Get ready to have your perception of elves flipped on its head!

More mythical creatures are introduced in Silver Apples–kelpies, hobgoblins, knuckers, yarthkins, and more.  You will probably want to look up traditional descriptions of these creatures after reading this book.

I believe that the last book in the series will be a continuation of the present story line.  It seems to have left off without fully resolving a couple of issues.  In particular, I believe that Jack’s sister has a major role to play in the next book.  We shall see!

I would recommend this book to elementary-age children up to teens.  It’s full of adventure but tame enough that I’m comfortable with my kids reading it on their own.

Possible Objections:

  • Some violence & scary creatures

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

The Sea of Trolls by Nancy Farmer

sea-of-trolls

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While perusing the shelves on a recent library visit, I found The Sea of Trolls and thought it looked interesting. It is the first book in the Sea of Trolls trilogy.

Premise:

Jack is the unnoticed son of an Anglo-Saxon farmer, until the Bard singles him out as his apprentice.  Jack begins to learn how to harness the life force and use magic.  Though life is looking up for Jack, it doesn’t last when Vikings invade his town.  Jack and his sister Lucy find themselves in the middle of an epic adventure involving magic, trolls, Vikings and dragons.  Can they survive and will they ever return home?

My thoughts:

I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked this book!  The action is a bit slow in starting, but once Jack leaves his homeland, the pace quickens and the story becomes more cohesive.

Jack is a main character whom I really like.  He’s down to earth, unassuming, and has a knack for blundering his way through all situations.  There are many other likable characters, though they all have their weaknesses and foibles–Olaf, Thorgil, the Bard, Bold Heart, and more.  I was disappointed that we didn’t get to see more of the Bard, but perhaps he’ll feature more in the other two books.

Norse mythology and some historical facts are interwoven into The Sea of Trolls.  I certainly didn’t take it as a historically accurate tale, but it’s fun to insert fact into fantasy stories.  For those of you who are fans of Norse mythology, Vikings, or European history, this story will give you a kick because it makes reference to all of those things.  Personally, I don’t know a lot about Norse mythology or the Vikings, but I’d like to learn more about them now.

I’m really looking forward to starting the next book in the series and hope that many of the same characters make a reappearance.  Since the adventure seems to have been fully resolved in this book, the next two should have their own independent story lines.  We shall see.

I would recommend this book to elementary-age children or even teens.  (In fact I just recommended it to my picky 11-year-old.)  It’s an entertaining adventure story that is free of bad language and not too descriptive in its violence.  This mama gives it a thumbs-up.

Possible Objections:

  • Some violence

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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Empyrion: The Search for Fierra by Stephen R. Lawhead

empyrion-fierra

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Empyrion: The Search for Fierra is a book which my husband recommended.  It’s an older book, but one he enjoyed as a young man.  Now it’s my turn to enjoy it!

Premise:

Orion Treet is hired to take part in a mission to check on the status of a space colony which has been established by a private company.  Three others are a part of the team and they successfully locate the colony on a far distant planet, but something has gone horribly wrong.  Not only have they arrived in the wrong time period, but they’ve also stumbled into a dystopia.  Their reception is less than ideal, and they must find a way to escape and find the Fieri, the other group of human descendants.  Can they find the answers to what went wrong and make things right again?

My thoughts:

I liked this book a lot more than I expected to.  It’s a unique story about how a human society develops, removed from the influences of Earth.  The setting is interesting and the supporting characters are unique, if a bit odd at times.  Yarden, Treet’s love interest, is definitely an enigma.  The end of the book segues into the next, when Treet continues his mission to keep Fierra safe.  I left out a lot of details, but I didn’t want to totally ruin the story for you.  It’s more fun to discover Empyrion for yourself.  🙂

I’m looking forward to reading the next book in the series, but it will probably have to wait a little while.  We’re scheduled to move in a few days and I don’t want to tote library books along with us!

I recommend this book to teen and adult fans of science fiction.  It’s a unique and entertaining adventure story, which I think you’ll really enjoy.

Favorite quotes:

“Treet had to admit that he did indeed like living; it was, after all, one of the things that made life so worthwhile.” (p.2)

“To be alive and know you were dying and know too there was nothing you could do about it, thought Treet in one of his lucid moments, was surely the worst trick of a whole universe full of lousy tricks.” (p.343)

Possible Objections:

  • A little violence
  • A bit of bad language
  • Religious commentary (There is a distinct good vs. evil undertone to the book, which can easily be ascribed a Christian influence.)

Rating: 4 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

artemis-fowl

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Artemis Fowl is the first book from my Thrift Store Young Adult Reading Challenge.  Strictly speaking, not all of the books in this challenge are young adult books.  A couple of them are middle grade books, but I’m not overly particular in my classification of novels for young people.  If a person is under 18, I see them as a kid.  🙂

Premise:

Artemis Fowl, child of a crime boss, is seeking a way to reestablish his family’s fortunes.  Though Artemis is only twelve, he’s a criminal mastermind and has plans to obtain gold from the Fairies.  Unfortunately, Artemis doesn’t know about Holly Short with the fairy’s LEPrecon task force–she is a fairy to be reckoned with!

My thoughts:

This book is definitely aimed at the younger preteen-teen crowd.  The story line is fairly simple, but I believe that some of the plot holes will be filled in in succeeding books.  The sections of the story which focus on Artemis and his employees were not terribly interesting to me.  It was probably because I don’t identify with Artemis’ life stage or inner thoughts.  This lady is not twelve years old anymore. 😉

I think the story really picked up and gained some charm when Holly Short and the fairies were introduced.  The characters were interesting, the banter funny, and the action started in earnest.  Holly and Commander Root were my favorite characters.

I won’t comment more particularly on the plot of the book (beyond what was said in the premise section) because there isn’t much I could say that wouldn’t give away the entire story line.  Although the book is simple, I am curious to see how Artemis’ criminal plans (and hopefully moral redemption) play out in future.

I wouldn’t recommend this book to preteens and teens, even though they are the target audience.  Some of the subject matter is, quite frankly, inappropriate for that age group.  I don’t think there is much here to interest adults, either.

Possible Objections:

  • The d-word (4x)
  • A bit of graphic violence
  • The protagonist is a child who engages in crime.  He’s selfish, greedy, deceitful, etc.

Rating: 2 1/2 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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