Bunnicula: A Rabbit-Tale of Mystery by Deborah & James Howe

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Title: Bunnicula: A Rabbit-Tale of Mystery by Deborah & James Howe

Premise:

The Munroe family finds an adorable baby bunny at the movie theater.  Harold, the family dog, and Chester, the cat, aren’t particularly concerned about the newest member of the family until funny things start happening to the food at night.  Could the cute and seemingly innocent bunny be the culprit?  Chester is determined to get to the bottom of the mystery, but how far will he go in his quest for the truth?

My thoughts:

I read Bunnicula as a child, but had never gone back to it since that time.  I forgot what a little gem of a book this is!

The book is written from the perspective of the dog, which makes for some very funny reading.  Things are explained from a dog’s point of view, and with a dog’s understanding and priorities.  Seeing things from his perspective gives the story a unique twist and makes it really fun to read.

Even though the book is quite short, there is a lot of humor and personality packed into the pages.  Chester is a thoroughly neurotic cat and he goes a bit bonkers in his quest to find out what Bunnicula gets up to at night.  Harold is a happy-go-lucky dog who is willing to give their new bunny a chance, but he’s also forced to rein in Chester just a tad bit.  The Munroe family seems to be good-naturedly dimwitted, and eventually the situation is resolved in such a way that they are none the wiser about the eating habits of their little bunny.

I think that the characters of Chester and Harold really make this book.  It’s almost like they’re the cat-dog version of the famous Laurel and Hardy comedy duo.  Chester is serious and uptight, whereas Harold is the bumbling, kindly oaf.  They play off of each other sooo well!  The scene where they are both trying to sit in the same chair is hilarious!

I recommend Bunnicula to children who are beginning to read chapter books, up through preteens.  It also makes a fun, quick family read-aloud.  This would be a great book to read around Halloween, too!

A favorite quote:

“Chester turned to me and said under his breath, ‘That lettuce looks repulsive, but if there’s any milk left, I get it.’  I certainly wasn’t going to argue with him.  I’m a water man myself.”  (p. 10)

Rating: 5 Stars

Until next time…

Lori

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4 Favorite Children’s Books #4

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Here are more of our favorite children’s books coming your way!  Are any of these your favorites, too?

“Could Be Worse!” by James Stevenson

Grandpa is a creature of habit and his grandkids think he’s a bit boring.  When Grandpa overhears their talk, he decides to tell them one whopper of a story about the adventures he had during the night when a giant bird abducted him from his bed.  My husband read this book as a child and introduced it to our children.  It’s become a family favorite!

Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban

Frances is such a picky eater that she refuses to eat anything other than bread and jam at every meal.  In a stroke of genius, her mother decides to offer Frances nothing but bread and jam.  Soon Frances tires of having absolutely no choice about what foods she will eat, and she asks her mother if she can have some of what everyone else is eating.  From then on, Frances’ food horizons expand and she is no longer a picky eater.

Madeline’s Rescue by Ludwig Bemelmans

Mischievous Madeline falls into the river and is rescued by a dog who follows her back to the boarding school.  The girls adopt the dog as their own, but when the trustees arrive for the annual inspection, they say she must go.  Heartbroken, the girls search for their beloved dog, Genevieve, and one night she returns to them.  Surprise, surprise–she is about to give birth to a litter of puppies!  Now all of the girls have a puppy of their own to care for.  We love the Madeline books!  The prose and illustrations are classic.  It is the 1954 Caldecott Medal Winner, too.

White Rabbit’s Color Book by Alan Baker

A curious white bunny learns about colors when he discovers some tubs of paint and takes a dip in them.  She also discovers which colors are made when you mix the primary colors.  The text and illustrations are simple, yet charming.  I read this book to my kids quite a bit when they were little.